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I would like to know how I can retrieve data from a database so I would have two columns. This is an example of what I would like to accomplish:

EMPLOYEE_Total | YEAR_HIRED
----------------------------
5                  1995

(number of employees hired on a particular year)

Unfortunately now I've got some troubles getting only one row per year as a result.

enter image description here

This is my query. Can you please help me? Thx.!

 SELECT COUNT(EMPLOYEE_ID) AS EMPLOYEE_TOTAL, TO_CHAR(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY') AS YEAR_HIRED 
 FROM EMPLOYEES
 WHERE hire_date 
 BETWEEN '01-JAN-1995' AND '31-DEC-1998'
 GROUP BY HIRE_DATE
 ORDER BY HIRE_DATE
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Example on existing Oracle table - tested:

SELECT count(*), to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY') hiredate 
  FROM scott.emp
 WHERE hiredate BETWEEN '01-JAN-1980' AND '01-JAN-1983'
GROUP BY to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY')
ORDER BY to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY')
/

Output: ORA-01481: invalid number format model

This will work and give the same result with any of order by:

SELECT count(*), to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY') hiredate 
  FROM scott.emp
 WHERE hiredate BETWEEN '01-JAN-1980' AND '01-JAN-1983'
GROUP BY to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY')
--ORDER BY to_date(hiredate, 'YYYY')
-- ORDER BY hiredate
 ORDER BY 2
/

COUNT(*)    HIREDATE
-----------------------
1          1980
10         1981
1          1982
share|improve this answer
    
. . Ironically, the first form worked in SQL Fiddle for me as you have written it. However, that is not the form I have in my answer. I have the year being YEAR_HIRED -- then there is no confusion as to which variable is being used in the order by. –  Gordon Linoff Feb 25 '13 at 22:07

Your current query is very close to what you actually want. You will want to alter your GROUP BY to use the TO_CHAR(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY'), this causes the grouping to be by year instead of thehire_date` which has the month, year, etc:

SELECT COUNT(EMPLOYEE_ID) AS EMPLOYEE_TOTAL, 
  TO_CHAR(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY') AS YEAR_HIRED 
FROM EMPLOYEES
WHERE hire_date BETWEEN '01-JAN-1995' AND '31-DEC-1998'
GROUP BY TO_CHAR(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY')
ORDER BY YEAR_HIRED
share|improve this answer

You want to change your group by and order by:

 SELECT COUNT(EMPLOYEE_ID) AS EMPLOYEE_TOTAL, TO_CHAR(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY') AS YEAR_HIRED 
 FROM EMPLOYEES
 WHERE hire_date 
 BETWEEN '01-JAN-1995' AND '31-DEC-1998'
 GROUP BY to_char(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY')
 ORDER BY to_char(HIRE_DATE, 'YYYY')

Art, the following works:

with emp as (select sysdate - 31*365 as hiredate from dual)
SELECT count(*), to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY') hiredate 
  FROM emp
 WHERE hiredate BETWEEN '01-JAN-1980' AND '01-JAN-1983'
GROUP BY to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY')
ORDER BY to_char(hiredate, 'YYYY')

You can check it out on SQL Fiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
Buddy thank you so much! This helps me a lot! –  Lorenzo Verri Feb 25 '13 at 21:30
    
@@Gordon - ORDER BY to_date(hire_date, 'YYYY') or hire_date or ORDER BY 2. Otherwise ORA-01481: invalid number format model –  Art Feb 25 '13 at 21:41
    
@Art . . . I have no idea what you are trying to say. hire_date is presumably a date, and one way to get the year is to_char(hire_date, 'yyyy'). I would never use to_date() for this. I must admit, though, that I might use extract(year from hiredate) in the spirit of preferring standard SQL. –  Gordon Linoff Feb 25 '13 at 21:49
    
@@Gordon - Please see my answer. –  Art Feb 25 '13 at 21:56
    
@Art . . . I tested the version on SQL Fiddle, and it works there. I'm actually a bit surprised, that it works regardless of the name in the select -- whether it is called HireDate or YearHired (other SQL engines might reject the first form). –  Gordon Linoff Feb 25 '13 at 22:06

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