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I've inherited some code that has a UnitOfWorkFactory which creates a unit of work inside each repository method. The problem is that a single repository method is rarely the full unit of work so if something goes wrong in say OrderService.PlaceOrder, it can't just rollback/discard that unit of work as it's not one unit.

Looking at the code I think the unit of work should be moved into either the service class or the presenter. The problem I then have is then how do I pass it to either the service or the repository? The presenter gets passed an instance of the service and the service gets passed an instance of the repository.

I could create the unit of work and have it injected the constructors of the services, repositories and presenters but then it would live beyond a single unit of work. This is a desktop app so the presenter and any services it gets passed can be alive for multiple units of work.

The only way I can think that I could pass the unit of work on is to add it as a parameter to all service/repository methods. I can't help thinking there must a better way than that though, am I missing something?

The code looks something like this:

Repository:

class OrderRepository
{
    public UnitOfWorkFactory UnitOfWorkFactory;

    public OrderRepository(UnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory)
    {
        UnitOfWorkFactory = unitOfWorkFactory;
    }

    public void Save(Order order)
    {
        using(var uow = UnitOfWorkFactory.Create())
        {
            // save order
            uow.commit();
        }
    }
}

Serivce:

class OrderService
{
    protected IOrderRepository OrderRepository;
    protected IProductService ProductService;

    public OrderService(IOrderRepository orderRepository, IProductRepository productService)
    {
        OrderRepository = orderRepository;
        ProductService = productService;
    }

    public void PlaceOrder(Order order)
    {
        foreach(var item in order.Items)
        {
            if(!ProductService.IsInstock(item.Product, item.Quantity))
                throw new ProductOutOfStockException(product);

            ProductService.MarkForDispatch(item.Product, item.Quantity);
        }

        OrderRepository.Save(order);
    }

    public void CancelOrder(Order order)
    {
        ProductService.UnmarkForDispatch(item.Product, item.Quantity);

        order.IsCanceled = true;
        OrderRepository.Save(order);
    }
}

Presenter:

class OrderPresenter
{
    protected IOrderView OrderView;
    protected IOrderService OrderService;

    public OrderPresenter(IOrderView orderView, IOrderService orderService)
    {
        OrderView = orderView;
        OrderService = orderService;
    }

    public void PlaceOrder()
    {
        OrderService.PlaceOrder(order);
    }

    public void CanelOrder()
    {
        OrderService.CancelOrder(order);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you using fat clients or thin (like HTTP)? – jgauffin Feb 26 '13 at 6:46
    
@jgauffin It's a fat client. It's a desktop app which handles all the business rules locally. – Sam Feb 26 '13 at 16:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't have a short answer for this. You can check the complete answer in this blog post that i have written before about this very subject. [Yet Another UoW, Repository Article].
(Please let me know what you think if you read the article)

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a good solution. I ended up doing it slightly differently (see below) but I'll mark this as the answer as it would also solve the problem. – Sam Mar 2 '13 at 20:00

I decided to use factories in the end and pass that the unit of work. The factory then creates everything else using the passed UOW.

This is what if ended up doing:

Repository:

public class Repository : IRepoository
{
    IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork;

    public Repository(IUnitOfWork uow)
    {
        UnitOfWork = uow;
    }

    public void SomeOtherMethod(int id)
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

Service:

public class Service : IService
{
    IUnitOfWork UnitOfWork;
    IRepoository Repository;

    public Service(IUnitOfWork uow, IRepoository repository)
    {
        UnitOfWork = uow;
        Repository = repository;
    }

    public void SomeMethod(int id)
    {
        Repository.SomeOtherMethod(id);
        // do other stuff
    }
}

Factories:

public class IUnitOfWorkFactory
{
    IUnitOfWork Create();
}

public class IServiceFactory
{
    IService Create(IUnitOfWork uow);
}

The IServiceFactory.Create method creates both the service and the repository the service depends on and gives them both the passed unit of work.

Preseter:

public class Presenter
{
    protected UnitOfWorkFactory UnitOfWorkFactory;
    protected IServiceFactory ServiceFactory;

    public Presenter(IUnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory, IServiceFactory serviceFactory)
    {
        UnitOfWorkFactory = unitOfWorkFactory;
        ServiceFactory = serviceFactory;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // Get a new UOW from the factory
        using(var uow = unitOfWorkFactory.Create())
        {
            // Then create the service and repository with the new UOW via the ServiceFactory
            var service = serviceFactory.Create(uow);
            service.SomeMethod(20);

            uow.Commit();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a good solution also but then you will need a factory for each service. if i ended up adding some of your ideas to my post i will remember to give you credit. – Ibrahim R. Najjar Mar 2 '13 at 21:14
1  
Yes, that is a down side of this approach. For me it isn't a problem as the code is using a library to do dependency injection so I can create a generic factory interface that accepts the UOW and it will auto create the implementation. You could also manually create a generic factory to do it just as easily. – Sam Mar 2 '13 at 21:16

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