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TL;DR: I want a locals() that looks in a containing scope.

Hi, all.

I'm teaching a course on Python programming to some chemist friends, and I want to be sure I really understand scope.

Consider:

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        print(locals())
        print(globals())
    b()

Locals prints an empty environment, and globals prints the usual globals. How do I get access to the environment where x is stored? Clearly the interpreter knows about it because I can refer to it.

Related: When does scoping happen? The following nameErrors on a = x+2 only if x=3 is included:

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        a = x+2
        x = 3
    b()

If you comment out x=3, the code works. Does this mean that python makes a lexical-scope pass over the code before it interprets it?

share|improve this question
    
do you need a list? because you could just do print x after print globals. EDIT: forget to say if you access x with print x then is also locals() filled with x:1. –  Julian Hille Feb 25 '13 at 22:25
    
possible duplicate of Get locals from calling namespace in Python –  piokuc Feb 25 '13 at 22:33

2 Answers 2

What is happening in your code is that when python see's the x=3 line in your b() method, it is recreating x with a scope within the b function instead of using the x with it's scope in the a function.

because your code then goes:

    a = x+2
    x = 3

it is saying that you need to define the inner scoped x before referencing it.

however, when you do not have the assigning of x within the b function python does not attempt to make a lower scoped x and will not throw any errors.

The following code will illustrate this:

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        x = 3
        print (x)

    def c():
        print (x)

    b()
    c()
    print (x)

a()

However if you were to declare x as global you could use it within a function, like so:

def a():
    global x
    x = 1

    def d():
        global x
        x += 2

    print (x)
    d()
    print (x)

a()

Python 3 has also added a nonlocal keyword that will let you access a variable from an enclosing scope, usage is like:

def a():
    x = 1

    def d():
        nonlocal x
        x += 2

    print (x)
    d()
    print (x)

a()

Will print the same results as the global example.


In case I miss-read the question:

As per the answer to Get locals from calling namespace in Python:

you can use:

import inspect

def a():
    x = 1

    def d():
        frame = inspect.currentframe()
        try:
            print (frame.f_back.f_locals)
        finally:
            del frame
    d()

a()

to get the local scope of the functions caller.

share|improve this answer
    
It's probably worth noting that Python 3 has added a nonlocal keyword that you can use in the inner function to be able to rebind an existing name from an enclosing scope. –  Blckknght Feb 25 '13 at 23:26
    
Very sexy! defiantly worth noting thanks. –  Serdalis Feb 26 '13 at 4:56

The statement print(locals()) refers to nearest enclosing scope, that is the def b(): function. When calling b(), you will print the locals to this b function, and definition of x is outside the scope.

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        print(locals())
        print(globals())
    b()
    print(locals())

would print x as a local variable.

For your second question:

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        #a = x+2
        x = 3
    b()

>>> a()

gives no error.

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        a = x+2
        #x = 3
    b()

>>> a()

gives no error.

And

def a():
    x = 1
    def b():
        a = x+2
        x = 3
    b()

>>> a()

gives following error: UnboundLocalError: local variable 'x' referenced before assignment

IMO (please check), in this third case, first statement in the body of b() looks for value of x in the most enclosing scope. And in this scope, x is assigned on the next line. If you only have statement a = x+2, x is not found in most enclosing scope, and is found in the 'next' enclosing scope, with x = 1.

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