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While perusing the legacy source, I found this:

DataSet myUPC = new DataSet();
myUPC = dbconn.getDataSet(dynSQL);

Resharper rightly "grays out" the "new Dataset()" part of it, and recommends, "Remove redundant initalizer," but is it as innocuous as that? Does the compiler simply dispose of the first instance just prior to the second assignment? IOW, is the first assignment simply unnecessary, or is it potentially harmful?

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Excellent question. In addition to what everyone else has suggested, let me also just mention "leave off = new DataSet() and just have DataSet myUPC; on account of that declares the variable as it is all you need. But why not combine the two? –  jcolebrand Feb 25 '13 at 22:37
    
Yes, combining the two definitely seems like the sensible thing to do. –  B. Clay Shannon Feb 25 '13 at 22:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Does the compiler simply dispose of the first instance just prior to the second assignment?

No, there's no automatic disposal here.

IOW, is the first assignment simply unnecessary, or is it potentially harmful?

It's harmful in two small ways:

  • It makes more work for both the initialization code and the garbage collector. It's unlikely to be significant, but it's there. If the constructor acquired some native resource that could be more serious.
  • It makes your code look like it wants to do something it doesn't actually want to do. You don't want to create a new empty DataSet, so why do so?

Just initialize the variable with the value you really want:

DataSet myUPC = dbconn.getDataSet(dynSQL);

Now your code shows exactly what you want to do. (I would fix the method name so that it follows .NET naming conventions, mind you.)

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Confession bear: I always auto vote-up when Jon Skeet answers :( –  Jean-Philippe Leclerc Feb 25 '13 at 22:32
1  
@Jean-PhilippeLeclerc don't do that. Upvote because it's a good answer. –  jcolebrand Feb 25 '13 at 22:34
    
Has Jon Skeet ever been wrong on SO? –  Jean-Philippe Leclerc Feb 25 '13 at 22:35
4  
@Jean-PhilippeLeclerc occasionally someone has posted a better answer than him, but I'm sure even Skeet would agree: "Upvote answers that are well written and accurate, not answers from people with high rep". –  jcolebrand Feb 25 '13 at 22:36
1  
@jcolebrand, in my experience, yes. But you should still read his question or answer before upvoting, you never know... you could be the one having to post a comment to rectify him ;) –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 25 '13 at 22:41

It's usually just unnecessary.

It would only be actively harmful if the DataSet constructor initiated some long running background thread or allocated a huge amount of memory which would stay around until the redundant object was garbage collected, which isn't instantaneous.

However, a well mannered constructor shouldn't do these things so you're probably safe. However, I would take note and fix the code whenever I saw this as, as Jon Skeet points out, it's making your code do unnecessary work creating and disposing of an object you have no intention of using and looks like you're missing some code.

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IOW, is the first assignment simply unnecessary, or is it potentially harmful?

The first assignment is unnecessary, but also potentially harmful, depending on the type. The first instance will become eligible for GC, but still get initialized (for no reason) and never used.

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"DataSet" is: public class DataSet : System.ComponentModel.MarshalByValueComponent Member of System.Data –  B. Clay Shannon Feb 25 '13 at 22:33

It'll hang around until it's garbage collected, as there are no other references to it. However, if the constructor has side effects (presumably DataSet's constructor doesn't), it could also be harmful.

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myUPC is overwritten with the output of dbconn.getDataSet(). This is because getDataSet() is a factory method, and returns an object of type Dataset.

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Yes, as indicated by the other answers it is actually somewhat harmful, mostly because it allocates an object that is never used and must be garbage collected eventually. But let me go into a bit more detail.

Could the first instance be disposed?

  DataSet myUPC = new DataSet();
  myUPC = dbconn.getDataSet(dynSQL);

Does the compiler simply dispose of the first instance just prior to the second assignment?

Assuming you mean by dispose the GC (garbage collector) collecting the new unused instance, then the answer is: no. Let me elaborate:

The GC may run at any time it pleases, for example when the heap will soon be full, or when trying to allocate an object that won't fit in the heap's remaining space. So the GC may also (just by chance) run exactly between your first and your second statement. However, this will not collect your new DataSet() object because there is a reference to it in the local variable myUPC. Objects are only considered for collection when there are no references to it1.

1) Actually, objects are only considered for collection when there is no chain of references from a so called root to the object. Roots include static fields, method arguments, local variables and evaluation stacks.

Could the constructor call be optimized away?

DataSet myUPC; /* Optimized away? */
myUPC = dbconn.getDataSet(dynSQL);

Also, the Just-In-Time compiler can't simply optimize the constructor call away because it may influence things other than the object being initialzed (i.e. have side-effects). For example, if the compiler optimized the constructor call away then the constructor would not print anything on the console. This is not desired or expected, and therefore the constructor call has to stay in there and result in a new instance.

class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Constructor called!");
    }
}

abstract class X
{
    void Do()
    {
        MyClass my = new MyClass();  // Should always print "Constructor called!"
        my = GetMyClass();
        // ...
    }

    protected abstract MyClass GetMyClass();
}
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