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I have made use of lapply to calculate cumulative products as a new column on a data set, BUT I had to get the data, calculate it, and then overwrite the original data using assign in each iteration of the lapply. I was wondering if there was a more elegant way of automatically assinging a new column name to an xts object

here is a mock example that produces the correct result...it should be copy paste-able into R

library(xts)
x <- xts(matrix(rnorm(10*1000,0.001,0.0001),ncol=10), Sys.Date()-c(1000:1))
colnames(x) <- paste0("x.",c(1:10))
tmp <- lapply(5:20, function(y){
    tmp.cum.prod <- rollapply(x,width=y,function(z){
        prod(rowMeans(z[,1:10])+1)-1
    },by.column=FALSE,align="right")
    orig.colnames <- colnames(x)
    x <- merge(x,tmp.cum.prod)
    colnames(x) <- c(orig.colnames,paste0("cum.prod.",y))
    assign("x",x,envir=.GlobalEnv)
})
tail(x)

But its the following lines that i think could probably be improved:

orig.colnames <- colnames(x)
x <- merge(x,tmp.cum.prod)
colnames(x) <- c(orig.colnames,paste0("cum.prod.",y))
assign("x",x,envir=.GlobalEnv)

Any suggestions? also if there are other lines that you think that could be improved in the above (e.g. the use of lapply), I am always keen to learn how to write more elegant code.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you're assigning to the global environment inside your lapply function, you should probably use a for loop instead. That's what I would do...

set.seed(21)
x <- xts(matrix(rnorm(10*1000,0.001,0.0001),ncol=10), Sys.Date()-1000:1)
colnames(x) <- paste0("x.",1:10)

rmx <- xts(rowMeans(x)+1,index(x))
for(i in 5:20) {
  tmp.cum.prod <- rollapplyr(rmx,i,prod,by.column=FALSE)-1
  colnames(tmp.cum.prod) <- paste0("cum.prod.",i)
  x <- merge(x,tmp.cum.prod)
}
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Is assigning to the global environment the main reason to using a for loop instead of lapply in your opinion? –  h.l.m Feb 26 '13 at 15:12
2  
It's a big reason. You are just using lapply as a loop anyway (i.e. you don't use the tmp object it creates). The for loop will likely be faster on larger objects too, because you're not storing all the intermediate data you create. –  Joshua Ulrich Feb 26 '13 at 15:15
    
oh ok...interesting I was always under the assumption that for loops were significantly more memory intensive than lapply, and thus lapply on average tended to be faster (is that true?), and so have probably got into the habit of if in doubt choose lapply but will definitely take the assignment to the global environment into consideration next time. I guess also using lapply more reguarly meant that if needing to upgrade to mclapply its not an too annoying a task to upgrade it... –  h.l.m Feb 26 '13 at 15:22
3  
I've never heard anyone say for loops used more memory than lapply. Loops in R aren't particularly slow, but people get that idea because they do things inside the loops that are slow (e.g. data.frame subsetting, appending to objects, etc.). If you're using lapply for the side effect of changing an existing object, you should be using a for loop instead. If you want to apply a function to each element of a list, use lapply. –  Joshua Ulrich Feb 26 '13 at 15:37
    
Cool, as always thank you for your insightful comments! –  h.l.m Feb 26 '13 at 15:51

You can use Reduce to do all the merge instead of looping.

> library(xts)
> x <- xts(matrix(rnorm(10*1000,0.001,0.0001),ncol=10), Sys.Date()-c(1000:1))
> colnames(x) <- paste0("x.",c(1:10))
> tmp <- lapply(5:20, function(y){
+   tmp.cum.prod <- rollapply(x,width=y,function(z){
+     prod(rowMeans(z[,1:10])+1)-1
+   },by.column=FALSE,align="right")
+   colnames(tmp.cum.prod) <- paste0("cum.prod.",y)
+   return(tmp.cum.prod)
+ })
> 
> result <- Reduce(function(...) merge(..., all=F), tmp, init = x)
> tail(result)
                    x.1          x.2          x.3          x.4          x.5          x.6          x.7          x.8          x.9         x.10
2013-02-20 0.0008919729 0.0010013599 0.0010276262 0.0007968856 0.0010731857 0.0010363689 0.0012281909 0.0010999609 0.0012081942 0.0010884836
2013-02-21 0.0009690167 0.0009131937 0.0009831485 0.0011843868 0.0011380318 0.0010424227 0.0011061298 0.0009944692 0.0010294051 0.0009762645
2013-02-22 0.0009269100 0.0010155799 0.0009445889 0.0010970406 0.0010646493 0.0011235968 0.0009402159 0.0010529831 0.0010884473 0.0008735272
2013-02-23 0.0009855041 0.0008282001 0.0011063870 0.0010430884 0.0008031531 0.0012577790 0.0009949316 0.0010046824 0.0011176581 0.0010516397
2013-02-24 0.0008176369 0.0009818399 0.0009964602 0.0009347190 0.0010362750 0.0010734247 0.0009749511 0.0010822521 0.0009335049 0.0010115921
2013-02-25 0.0009861176 0.0007606129 0.0010802525 0.0008771646 0.0010292476 0.0009319029 0.0011008009 0.0007901849 0.0011368412 0.0009677856
            cum.prod.5  cum.prod.6  cum.prod.7  cum.prod.8  cum.prod.9 cum.prod.10 cum.prod.11 cum.prod.12 cum.prod.13 cum.prod.14 cum.prod.15
2013-02-20 0.005080621 0.006084484 0.007080320 0.008074656 0.009105274  0.01009016  0.01111046  0.01212787  0.01317140  0.01416878  0.01516398
2013-02-21 0.005127238 0.006119520 0.007124420 0.008121286 0.009116649  0.01014833  0.01113423  0.01215559  0.01317405  0.01421867  0.01521707
2013-02-22 0.005119219 0.006145185 0.007138471 0.008144390 0.009142264  0.01013864  0.01117136  0.01215826  0.01318065  0.01420015  0.01524582
2013-02-23 0.005120808 0.006143740 0.007170751 0.008165050 0.009171994  0.01017089  0.01116827  0.01220205  0.01318996  0.01421339  0.01523392
2013-02-24 0.005105586 0.006110114 0.007134052 0.008162074 0.009157352  0.01016529  0.01116516  0.01216353  0.01319833  0.01418721  0.01521165
2013-02-25 0.005026133 0.006076609 0.007082108 0.008107036 0.009136051  0.01013229  0.01114120  0.01214204  0.01314137  0.01417717  0.01516701
           cum.prod.16 cum.prod.17 cum.prod.18 cum.prod.19 cum.prod.20
2013-02-20  0.01619964  0.01724359  0.01830398  0.01928576  0.02034408
2013-02-21  0.01621330  0.01725003  0.01829506  0.01935654  0.02033935
2013-02-22  0.01624524  0.01724248  0.01828025  0.01932634  0.02038890
2013-02-23  0.01628066  0.01728110  0.01827936  0.01931819  0.02036534
2013-02-24  0.01623318  0.01728095  0.01828237  0.01928161  0.02032147
2013-02-25  0.01619243  0.01721496  0.01826374  0.01926613  0.02026633
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