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Searched far and wide to answer my question, but everything seems far to complex. I am a newbie at Javascript, and I would like help with this question instead of someone just answering it (if you feel the need to give a straight answer, a breakdown would be great).

I have a function that brings in a string from a HTML text area. I need to search through the string for any links, therefore, searching for a "www." or a "http://". I then need to loop through that part, until the end of the link (or a space appears). This needs to be saved as a variable, and then a "<a href = newVar>" needs to be placed at the beginning, then along with the new variable after that, then ending with the </a> tag.

There may be many URL's within the string.

I HAVE to do this as a for loop.

I kind of have a starting code, but I'm super stuck! Any help is greatly appreciated!

//Checking for URL's in the message string
function checkLink(text)
{
    for (var i=0; i == text.length; i++)
    {
        var currentChar = text.charAt(i);
        if(text.charAt(i) == "w" && text.charAt(i+1) == "w" && text.charAt(i + 2) ==  "w" && text.charAt(i + 3) == ".")
        {
            //Not to sure what to do here
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you have to do it in a loop? Is it homework? – FakeRainBrigand Feb 25 '13 at 23:38
3  
@JadeMulholland You should research the split() function and get started with simple matching with regular expressions. – slamborne Feb 25 '13 at 23:45
2  
@slamborne - Looked into the split function, seems like a great approach. Thanks for your help :) – Fizzix Feb 26 '13 at 0:01
1  
@JadeMulholland - No problem. If you're curious to see a simple solution, this is how I would get started: jsfiddle.net/slamborne/TekwU/1 – slamborne Feb 26 '13 at 0:06
1  
First hint: Don't look for w... then w... then w.... Just look for www. You can just use s.indexOf('www'); – jahroy Feb 26 '13 at 0:14
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Regular Expressions are by far the best way to go with this. But, since this is for educational purposes, here's a method for finding URLs in strings. It isn't a correct answer, but shows the concepts.

Let's say you have this text below:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Duis faucibus dui nec est auctor auctor. Nullam vulputate, augue non auctor rhoncus, urna urna tempus velit, non tincidunt nibh orci et elit. Integer sed nibh massa, eget vestibulum velit. www.Nulla.com in elit vitae massa egestas accumsan ac semper nisl. Curabitur viverra lorem in urna porttitor sit amet aliquam sapien http://imperdiet.org. Pellentesque ultricies sagittis malesuada. Mauris lobortis aliquam felis sit amet vestibulum. In vitae faucibus lectus. Donec consectetur ante nisi. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse potenti.

There are two links in there. The code looks like this.

Somehow get the text in a variable, that we'll call text.

var text = '<that text above>';

Now we split the text into an array called words.

var words = text.split(' ');

We'll be producing new output in this example, so we need a string variable to hold it.

var new_text = '';

It seems you understand loops, but this is just what most loops going through an array look like.

for (var i=0; i < words.length; i++) {
    var word = words[i];

We check if the start of this 'word' (which refers to each section of text separated by spaces, in this context) contains either of our prefixes. In reality bit.ly is a valid URL. Regular expressions have a better handle of this than us.

    if (word.indexOf('http://') === 0 || word.indexOf('www.') === 0) {

We change the value of the word by putting our link syntax. I used Markdown, but you can do HTML, or anything you like.

         word = '[A LINK]' + '(' + word + ')';
    }

This is our output we talked about at the top of the script. Just keep appending things onto this, reguardless of wheather they were modified or not. The problem with this is there could be 1, or 94 spaces after our word, but we always put back one. Regular Expressions have functionality to deal with this better.

    new_text += word + ' ';
}

new_text now looks like this.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Duis faucibus dui nec est auctor auctor. Nullam vulputate, augue 
non auctor rhoncus, urna urna tempus velit, non tincidunt nibh 
orci et elit. Integer sed nibh massa, eget vestibulum 
velit. [A LINK](www.Nulla.com) in elit vitae massa egestas
accumsan ac semper nisl. Curabitur viverra lorem in urna 
porttitor sit amet aliquam sapien [A LINK](http://imperdiet.org.) 
Pellentesque ultricies sagittis malesuada. Mauris lobortis aliquam 
felis sit amet vestibulum. In vitae faucibus lectus. Donec 
consectetur ante nisi. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, 
consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse potenti. 

which on stack overflow, looks like this:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Duis faucibus dui nec est auctor auctor. Nullam vulputate, augue non auctor rhoncus, urna urna tempus velit, non tincidunt nibh orci et elit. Integer sed nibh massa, eget vestibulum velit. A LINK in elit vitae massa egestas accumsan ac semper nisl. Curabitur viverra lorem in urna porttitor sit amet aliquam sapien A LINK Pellentesque ultricies sagittis malesuada. Mauris lobortis aliquam felis sit amet vestibulum. In vitae faucibus lectus. Donec consectetur ante nisi. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse potenti.

Notice a problem? The split technique saw 'http://imperdiet.org.' as a url. What the user meant was to have 'http://imperdiet.org' be the url, and have a period after it. Regular Expressions also allow you to avoid this.

The demo has all of the code without my commentary in-between.

demo

If you want to learn about Regular Expressions, I recommend this site.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic answer and helped me very much! Thanks heaps for your help @FakeRasinBrigand – Fizzix Feb 26 '13 at 0:51
    
This site is great for testing your regex: regexpal.com – slamborne Feb 27 '13 at 4:39

I would suggest iterating over each word, split by spaces.

//split string by any space characters
textarea.value.split(/\s/).reduce(function (prev, cur) {
    //word starts with http; convert to link
    if (cur.indexOf('http') === 0) {
        cur = '<a href="' + cur + '">' + cur + '</a>';
    }
    //word starts with www; convert to http://+link
    else if (cur.indexOf('www') === 0) {
        cur = '<a href="http://' + cur + '">' + cur + '</a>';
    }
    //append space to display properly
    return prev + cur + ' ';
}, '');

This solution is not perfect as the exact space is not preserved, and it looks for just http and not https?://, but I'll leave it to you to figure out those issues.

http://jsfiddle.net/98gMb/

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