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I have two Domain classes as follows:

Class FooA:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace XXX.MyCore.Domain
{
  public class FooA
    {
        public string String_FA { get; set; } 
        public string String_FB { get; set; }

    }
}

Class FooB

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace XXX.MyCore.Domain
{
    public class FooB
    {
        public string FooC{ get; set; }
        public List<FooA> FooA_List { get; set; }

    }
}

My xml has repeated nodes as follows (6 total):

:
:
      <ns2:Example>
        <A>DataA1</A>
        <B>DataB1</B>   
      </ns2:Example>
      <ns2:Example>
        <A>DataA2</A>
        <B>DataB2</B>
      </ns2:Example>
:
:

I have another class which references these domain objects.

:
:

List<FooA> fooANodeElemValue = new List<FooA>();
FooA fA = new FooA();

// I now iterate through the XML elements to parse sibling values

 foreach (XElement elem in document.Descendants().Elements(nsUsr + "ExampleA"))
                                {
                                    fA.String_FA= elem.Element("A").Value;
                                    fA.String_FB= elem.Element("B").Value;


                                    fooNodeElemValue.Add(fA);
                                    FooB.FooA_List= fooNodeElemValue;

                                }

I am able to build a list of six parent items and the respective sub- elements each containing the fA objects. However,with each iteration in the forEach block, the list is overwritten with the new sibling node values. Specifically,

fooNodeElemValue.Add(fA);

and

FooB.FooA_List= fooNodeElemValue;

are overwritten.

Thus when the loop is complete, each list element is replicated 6x So,

FooB.FooA_List[0] = {DataA2, DataB2}

and

FooB.FooA_List[1] = {DataA2, DataB2}
              :
              :

Any help is tremendously appreciated.

Thanks!

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2 Answers

First of all, you want to instantiate a new FooA in each itteration. Secondly, there is no reason to reset the list each time, you can use the existing one. Try these changes:

// Create a new list and assign it to the public property of FooB...
FooB.FooA_List = new List<FooA>();

foreach (XElement elem in document.Descendants().Elements(nsUsr + "ExampleA"))
{
    // Create a temporary variable (in the scope of this loop iteration) to store my new FooA class instance...
    FooA fA = new FooA() { 
        String_FA = elem.Element("A").Value, 
        String_FB = elem.Element("B").Value
    };

    // Because FooB.FooA_List is the list I want to add items to, I just access the public property directly.
    FooB.FooA_List.Add(fA);
}

Doing things like creating a whole new list and then assigning that list to the property of FooA is just a lot of extra work. fA is an instance that exists only within the scope of the current loop itteration, as soon as the loop goes to the next one, fA is automatically brand new, as though it never existed.

FooB.FooA_List is the list instance you are adding things to. It doesn't make sense to constantly reassign this variable to a different copy of your list instance. So, there is no need to use FooB.FooA_List = whatever within your loop since you can access the instance directly via FooB.FooA_List, and make it do your work via FooB.FooA_List.Add(whatever);

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Thanks, I figured it out prior to reviewing your response. I appreciate your response. –  IOS_Dev Feb 26 '13 at 13:09
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I figured out what the issue is. 1. I need to instantiate the fA object within the loop. 2. I need to set the fA object to null within the loop.

foreach (XElement elem in document.Descendants().Elements(nsUsr + "ExampleA"))
{
FooA fA = new FooA();                             
fA.String_FA= elem.Element("A").Value;
fA.String_FB= elem.Element("B").Value;

fooNodeElemValue.Add(fA);
FooB.FooA_List= fooNodeElemValue;
fA =null;
}
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Actually, you don't need to set it to null at the end of the loop. As soon as a single loop itteration completes, all scope variables, of which fA is one, are descoped. Also, you don't need to set FooB.FooA_List = anything every time in the loop. It's already been set once, you can now just reference it and update it through FooB.FooA_List.Add(fA); Your code is more confusing than it needs to be. I'll update my answer with comments that better explains it. –  EtherDragon Feb 26 '13 at 18:00
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