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Ok here are my two tables that are having conflicts:

CREATE TABLE visit_physician (
   visit_id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   physician_id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   physician_role INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   PRIMARY KEY(visit_id, physician_id)
);

CREATE TABLE physician_role (
   id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT KEY,
   name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
   UNIQUE(name)
);

ALTER TABLE visit_physician
ADD CONSTRAINT FK_roleid
FOREIGN KEY (physician_role) REFERENCES physician_role(id)
ON UPDATE CASCADE
ON DELETE CASCADE;

physician_role and the id are the same datatypes and size and everything.. so why is not creating? My other foreign keys assigned without a problem..

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Both tables must be InnoDB –  Explosion Pills Feb 25 '13 at 23:54
    
How do you check that and where do I edit that? All the other tables didn't have a problem with this so that's why I'm confused. I created them all at the same time. –  Peanut Feb 25 '13 at 23:59
1  
SHOW TABLE STATUS will tell you the engine. You would also not be able to do the ALTER if there are existing rows that would cause an integrity constraint violatin –  Explosion Pills Feb 26 '13 at 0:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tested your statements on MySQL 5.5.29, and they work fine. Note that both tables must use the InnoDB storage engine for foreign keys to be supported. If they aren't, MySQL will parse but ignore the declaration of these constraints.

On my instance, the default storage engine is InnoDB. Your CREATE TABLE statements don't specify the storage engine, so they will use the default. Check what the default storage engine is in your environment:

mysql> show global variables like 'default_storage_engine';
+------------------------+--------+
| Variable_name          | Value  |
+------------------------+--------+
| default_storage_engine | InnoDB |
+------------------------+--------+

Check the storage engine used by your tables with SHOW TABLE STATUS LIKE '%physician%'. Look at the Engine column of the output:

+-----------------+--------+---------+------------+------+----------------+-------------+-----------------+--------------+-----------+----------------+---------------------+-------------+------------+-------------------+----------+----------------+---------+
| Name            | Engine | Version | Row_format | Rows | Avg_row_length | Data_length | Max_data_length | Index_length | Data_free | Auto_increment | Create_time         | Update_time | Check_time | Collation         | Checksum | Create_options | Comment |
+-----------------+--------+---------+------------+------+----------------+-------------+-----------------+--------------+-----------+----------------+---------------------+-------------+------------+-------------------+----------+----------------+---------+
| physician_role  | InnoDB |      10 | Compact    |    0 |              0 |       16384 |               0 |        16384 |         0 |              1 | 2013-02-25 15:56:26 | NULL        | NULL       | latin1_swedish_ci |     NULL |                |         |
| visit_physician | InnoDB |      10 | Compact    |    0 |              0 |       16384 |               0 |        16384 |         0 |           NULL | 2013-02-25 15:56:26 | NULL        | NULL       | latin1_swedish_ci |     NULL |                |         |
+-----------------+--------+---------+------------+------+----------------+-------------+-----------------+--------------+-----------+----------------+---------------------+-------------+------------+-------------------+----------+----------------+---------+

If the Engine is MyISAM or another storage engine, it's likely that creation of the constraint will not work.

If you want to change the storage engine to InnoDB, you can do this:

mysql> ALTER TABLE visit_physician ENGINE=InnODB;
mysql> ALTER TABLE physician_role ENGINE=InnODB;

Then you should be able to re-execute the creation of the constraint. However, if the tables already have data that doesn't satisfy the constraint, it could cause problems.

But before any such change, I would encourage you to test that your application still works with the different storage engine. It's very likely that it will work fine, but testing is always a good idea.


What happens when you try to add the foreign key? If it gives an error like this:

ERROR 1452 (23000): Cannot add or update a child row: a foreign key constraint 
fails (`test`.`#sql-c67_52`, CONSTRAINT `FK_roleid` FOREIGN KEY (`physician_role`) 
REFERENCES `physician_role` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE)

then you could have some values already in the tables that don't satisfy the constraint.

Other possibilities about storage engine and data type could cause the error too, but we have ruled that out because you say the tables are both InnoDB and the data types appear the same, and it works when I test it.

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Yes I checked with all you queries and my default is InnoDB and both tables are in fact InnoDB.. so I'm lost.. =( –  Peanut Feb 26 '13 at 0:34

I think it may had something to do with two foreign key constraints on one table, but I added them in WHILE creating the tables so it read this:

CREATE TABLE visit_physician (
   visit_id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   physician_id INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   physician_role INT(11) UNSIGNED NOT NULL,
   PRIMARY KEY(visit_id, physician_id),
   CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (physician_id) REFERENCES user (id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE,
   CONSTRAINT FOREIGN KEY (physician_role) REFERENCES physician_role (id) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

Just in case if anyone was having the weird problem I was having..

share|improve this answer
    
In the future, this sort of thing would be good to mention in your original question. It's possible to add two foreign keys in a single ALTER TABLE statement, you just have to separate the two actions by commas. –  Bill Karwin Feb 26 '13 at 2:49

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