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I current have a file with the following:

<refrigerator>
    <food="watermelon" location="topShelf" />
    <!--
    <food="mango" location="bottomShelf" />
    --> 
    <!--
    <food="orange" location="middleShelf" />
    --> 
</refrigerator>

How can I use 'sed' to remove <!-- and --> so "mango" can be uncommented from the file? However, if there are other lines commented in the file, I want them to remain commented?

Thanks!

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

With sed you could try:

sed '/<!--/{ N; N; s/.*\n\(.*food="mango".*\)\n.*-->.*/\1/; }' file
share|improve this answer
    
I always have so much trouble with sed. Can you explain how to read/interpret the line you've written? Thanks! – user459811 Feb 26 '13 at 0:47
    
In particular, why don't we have to match the ending -->? – user459811 Feb 26 '13 at 0:53
    
/<!--/ : if the first part of a comment is found, then read the next two lines into the line buffer ( N ) . Then the substute command ( s ) replaces the three lines with the middle line ( \1 ) if it contains the phrase food="mango". If the middle line does not contain the phrase, there is not substitution and the the three lines in the line buffer get printed. – Scrutinizer Feb 26 '13 at 0:54
    
Yes you could probably further improve the reliability by including -->. I'll edit the post. – Scrutinizer Feb 26 '13 at 0:58

sed is not the right tool for this (not multi-line by default), try using , this is more suitable for this case :

$ perl -i -0777 -pe 's/\s*<!--\s*\n(.*?food="mango".*?)\n\s*-->/\n$1/' file.txt

Output

<refrigerator>
    <food="watermelon" location="topShelf" />
    <food="mango" location="bottomShelf" /> 
    <!--
    <food="orange" location="middleShelf" />
    --> 
</refrigerator>

Explanations

  • -i switch edit the file in place (just like sed -i)
  • -0777 read the whole file in one time (can read by paragraph too with -00)
  • -p assume "while (<>) { ... }" loop around program, and print newlines
  • s/// is the skeleton for sed like substitutions
  • \s is a blank character for Perl
  • .*? stands for not greedy match
  • $1 is the same as sed \1 (captured part)

Doc

See

share|improve this answer
    
I'm currently limited to using bash. If sed is not the right tool, is it possible with awk? Thanks for the response! – user459811 Feb 26 '13 at 0:37
1  
This is a shell command as you had seen I guess. If you don't have perl, you can use Scrutinizer's solution with sed, but it will be harder to re-use in the future I guess. Sed is not made originally for multilines. – Gilles Quenot Feb 26 '13 at 0:40
    
@user459811, Since you run Ubuntu, perl will be there, no doubt. – Gilles Quenot Feb 26 '13 at 0:56

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