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I've been experimenting with CLLocationManager's startMonitoringSignificantLocationChanges and I've run into some problems with Core Data. It turns out that since iOS 5.0, Core Data defaults to using NSFileProtectionCompleteUntilFirstUserAuthentication. This means that if a passcode is set, the persistent store is unavailable from the time the device is turned on until the time the passcode is first entered. If you're using location updates, it's possible your app may get launched during that time, and Core Data will get an error trying to load the persistent store.

Obviously switching to NSFileProtectionNone would be the easiest way to solve this. I'd prefer not to though—I'm not storing anything super sensitive in the database, but these location updates aren't super critical either.

I know I can use [[UIApplication sharedApplication] isProtectedDataAvailable] to check whether the data has been unlocked yet, and I can use applicationProtectedDataWillBecomeUnavailable: in my application delegate to respond appropriately once it is unlocked. This seems messy to me though—I'll have to add in a bunch of extra checks to make sure nothing goes wrong if the persistent store is unavailable, re-setup a bunch of things once it does become available, and so on. And that extra code doesn't offer much benefit—the app still won't be able to do anything if it launches in this state.

So I guess I'm just not sure which is the more "proper" way to deal this:

  1. Switch to NSFileProtectionNone.
  2. Add in the extra checks to skip over things if the store is unavailable, and use applicationProtectedDataWillBecomeUnavailable: to set things up again once it is.
  3. If the app is launched in the background ([[UIApplication sharedApplication] applicationState] == UIApplicationStateBackground) and protected data is unavailable ([[UIApplication sharedApplication] isProtectedDataAvailable] == NO)) just call exit(0) (or something similar) to quit the app. On one hand this seems like the simplest solution, and I don't really see any downsides. But it also seems… "wrong"? I guess I can't decide if it's a clean solution or just a lazy one.
  4. Something else I'm just not thinking of?
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After thinking this over for a while I've come up with a solution I'm happy with. One thing to consider with the exit(0) option is that if the user takes a while to unlock the device, the app could be continually loading, quitting, and reloading. Whereas if you simply prevent the app from doing much, it will probably only have to load once, and will most likely be more efficient. So I decided to try my option 3 and see how messy it really was. It turned out to be simpler than I thought.

First I added a BOOL setupComplete property to my app delegate. This gives me an easy way to check if the app was fully launched at various points. Then in application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: I attempt to initialize the managed object context, then do something like this:

NSManagedObjectContext *moc = [self managedObjectContext];
if (moc) {
    self.setupComplete = YES;
    [self setupWithManagedObjectContext:moc];
} else {
    UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
    if ([app applicationState] == UIApplicationStateBackground && ![app isProtectedDataAvailable]) {
        [app beginIgnoringInteractionEvents];
    } else [self presentErrorWithTitle:@"There was an error opening the database."];
}

setupWithManagedObjectContext: is just a custom method that finishes setting up. I'm not sure the beginIgnoringInteractionEvents is necessary, but I added it to be on the safe side. That way when the app is brought to the front, I can be sure the interface is frozen until setup is complete. It might avoid a crash if an eager user is tapping anxiously.

Then in applicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable: I call something like this:

if (!self.setupComplete) {
    NSManagedObjectContext *moc = [self managedObjectContext];
    if (moc) {
        self.setupComplete = YES;
        [self setupWithManagedObjectContext:moc];
        UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
        if ([app isIgnoringInteractionEvents]) [app endIgnoringInteractionEvents];
    } else [self presentErrorWithTitle:@"There was an error opening the database."];
}

That finishes the setup and re-enables the interface. That's most of the work, but you'll also need to check through your other code to make sure nothing that relies on Core Data is getting called before your persistent store is available. One thing to watch out for is that applicationWillEnterForeground and applicationDidBecomeActive may get called before applicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable if the user launches the app from this background state. So in various places I've added if (self.setupComplete) { … } to make sure nothing runs before it's ready. I also had a couple of places where I needed to refresh the interface once the database was loaded.

In order to (partially) test this without a lot of driving around, I temporarily modified application:didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: to not set up the database:

NSManagedObjectContext *moc = nil; // [self managedObjectContext];
if (moc) {
    self.setupComplete = YES;
    [self setupWithManagedObjectContext:moc];
} else {
    UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
    // if ([app applicationState] == UIApplicationStateBackground && ![app isProtectedDataAvailable]) {
        [app beginIgnoringInteractionEvents];
    // } else [self presentErrorWithTitle:@"There was an error opening the database."];
}

Then I moved my code in applicationProtectedDataDidBecomeAvailable: over to applicationWillEnterForeground:. That way I could launch the app, make sure nothing unexpected happens, press the home button, open the app again, and make sure everything was working. Since the actual code requires moving a significant distance and waiting five minutes each time, this gave me a good way to approximate what was happening.

One last thing that tripped me up was my persistent store coordinator. A typical implementation might look something like this:

- (NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *)persistentStoreCoordinator {
    if (_persistentStoreCoordinator != nil) return _persistentStoreCoordinator;

    NSURL *storeURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectory] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"Test.sqlite"];

    NSError *error = nil;
    _persistentStoreCoordinator = [[NSPersistentStoreCoordinator alloc] initWithManagedObjectModel:[self managedObjectModel]];
    if (![_persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) {
        NSLog(@"Unresolved error %@, %@", error, [error userInfo]);
    }    

    return _persistentStoreCoordinator;
}

This is loosely based on Apple's sample code, which does explain in comments that you need to handle the error appropriately. My own code does a bit more than this, but one thing I hadn't considered is that if there's an error loading the persistent store, this will return a non-nil result! That was allowing all my other code to proceed as though it was working correctly. And even if persistentStoreCoordinator was called again, it would just return the same coordinator, without a valid store, instead of trying to load the store again. There are various ways you could deal with this, but to me it seemed best to not set _persistentStoreCoordinator unless it was able to add the store:

- (NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *)persistentStoreCoordinator {
    if (_persistentStoreCoordinator != nil) return _persistentStoreCoordinator;

    NSURL *storeURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectory] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"Test.sqlite"];

    NSError *error = nil;
    NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *coordinator = [[NSPersistentStoreCoordinator alloc] initWithManagedObjectModel:[self managedObjectModel]];
    if ([coordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) {
        _persistentStoreCoordinator = coordinator;
    } else {
        NSLog(@"Unresolved error %@, %@", error, [error userInfo]);
    }    

    return _persistentStoreCoordinator;
}
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@robertspacer Won't _persistentStoreCoordinator be nil on on this line: if ([_persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) { –  Glen T Apr 5 '13 at 22:43
    
@Glen T Yes, that should have been a reference to coordinator. Fixed. –  robotspacer Apr 8 '13 at 23:59

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