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I want to sift through text files looking for suspicious activity. I'm a little familiar with bash scripting, including grep, sed and awk. My research on stackoverflow.com, tldp.org, etc, and talk with colleagues shows that perl and python are best suited for my task, but I have zero experience with those scripting languages.

Inputs with various scripting, compiled or interpreted languages are welcome. Due to my limitations, please add comments to the code, enabling me to quickly understand and learn the language.

Ok, the task is sorting and counting items sorted in columns. I /can/ accomplish part of this this using grep, awk and sed. Unfortunately, the recursive aspects (as I perceive the problem) has me stumped.

The input text is sorted, two columns of ip addresses (simplified in my example, below) and a column for a destination port (of all possible values). The size of this file may be several megabytes, but probably never more than 250MB at at time, so absolute efficiency isn't necessary. Simplicity is.

SIP        DIP        DPt
111.100    200.150    80
111.100    200.150    443
111.100    200.155    22
111.100    200.155    80
111.100    200.155    443
111.100    200.160    80
111.100    200.165    139
111.100    200.165    443
111.100    200.165    512
115.102    225.150    80
115.102    225.150    137
115.102    225.150    443
120.125    250.175    23
120.135    250.145    23
125.155    250.165    80
125.155    250.165    139
125.155    250.175    1023

The code I have working (drafting this from memory ... not currently at my linux box) is similar to this ...

#!/bin/bash

declare -i counter=0
SIP=null       # current source ip.
SIP_last=null  # for last ip address processed.
SIP_next=null  # not found a use for this, yet. 
               # sorting usually reqs three vars, so here it is.

for SIP in `zcat textfile.gz | awk '{ if ($3 <1024) print $1,$2,$3}'` do
# Ensure I count the first item.  This was problematic at first.
if [[ "$SIP_last" == null ]] then
SIP_last=$SIP
counter=counter+1  # counter=+ didn't work reliably.

# Do something useful.  As shown, it works.
if [[ "$SIP" == "$SIP_last" ]] then
counter=counter+1

if [[ "$SIP != "$SIP_last" ]] then
echo SIP: $SIP_last     Counter: $counter   # DIP code has not yet been added.
SIP_last=$SIP

# Ensure I always catch the last item.  Still working on this issue.
# XXX

done

Using the input provided above, the output should look something like this ...

SIP      DIP Ct   Ports
         > 2      < 1024
111.100  200.150  80, 443
111.100  200.155  20, 80, 443
111.100  200.165  139, 443, 512
115.102  225.150  80, 137, 443

Looking at the output you can see the crux of the matter is only reporting DIP counts > 2 and Ports < 1024. Limiting the ports to < 1024 is simple enough using the provided awk statement. It's matching up the DIPs to the SIPs and keeping a running tally of the DPts that's the kicker.

Again, this is from memory, so forgive the coding errors. Thanks for your assistance.

Allen.

share|improve this question
    
You're using the wrong tool for the job. Learning just the basics of python would make this much, much easier. If you change the question to accept help in Python, I'm happy to help – goron Feb 26 '13 at 1:45
1  
A shell is an environment from which to call tools and manipulate files and processes. It is not a language in which to write scripts to parse text files - there are tools designed for that job. In this case, awk would be your best bet as it exists on all UNIX installations and has a small, simple language specifically designed for manipulating text files. – Ed Morton Feb 26 '13 at 2:10
    
Goron, you're right, of course. Let me see if my hobby box has python installed and enabled. Will let you know later today. Thanks ... Allen. – Allen Feb 26 '13 at 12:47
    
Ed, you're right, too. Perhaps it's semantics. I probably speak about the shell scripts (bash) as if they were a programming language, not a command interpreter framework for automating tasks. I'll try your suggestion and let you k – Allen Feb 26 '13 at 12:48
    
@goron I modified the question to request help in languages beyond bash scripts (acknowledging that bash scripts aren't a language). Thanks for your willingness to help with this task. – Allen Mar 1 '13 at 8:20

With your posted sample input file:

$ awk '
NR==1 { print; next }
$3 < 1024 {
   key = $1 "\t" $2
   if (!seen[key,$3]++) {
      cnt[key]++
      vals[key] = vals[key] sep[key] $3
      sep[key] = ", "
   }
}
END { for (key in cnt) if (cnt[key] > 1) print key "\t" vals[key] }
' file
SIP        DIP        DPt
111.100 200.155 22, 80, 443
111.100 200.165 139, 443, 512
125.155 250.165 80, 139
115.102 225.150 80, 137, 443
111.100 200.150 80, 443

If that's not what you're looking for, please clarify.

share|improve this answer
    
Ed, thanks for your response. Sorry for the delay to provide feedback. Examining my input files yesterday I confir – Allen Mar 1 '13 at 8:01
    
Oops. Try this again ... Ed, thanks for your response. Sorry for the delay to provide feedback. Examining my input files yesterday I confirmed the input lines contain many duplicate SIP's, DIP's and DPt's. After typing your code in, the result was 100.111 200.155 80, 80, 80, 80, 80. Your output of 100.111. 200.155 22, 80, 443 is the desired output. I tried to patch the code, without success. :( Thanks for your assistance. – Allen Mar 1 '13 at 8:09
    
@Allen I updated my answer, try it now. For more help, though, update your question to contain representative input and expected output including the duplicates you mention. – Ed Morton Mar 1 '13 at 14:46

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