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I am trying to overload the "+" operator for a Matrix program. Here's my code, it looks OK to me. But when i add two matrices in my main-function nothing happens. Can someone help? thanks :)

btw:

-The program compiles and runs just fine up until the point where it should add to Matrices.

-I assume there's problem is in the implementation of my operator+()-function, because i have copied the code into an add(Mtrx,Mtrx) function to test and it didn't work either.

//Mtrx.h

#ifndef MTRX_H_
#define MTRX_H_
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
using std::ostream;

class Mtrx {
    int lines,cols;
    float **p;
public:

    Mtrx();
    Mtrx(int,int);
    int getLines();
    int getCols();
    float getElement(int,int);
    void setLines(int);
    void setCols(int);
    void setElement(int,int,float);

    Mtrx operator+(Mtrx&);

        ~Mtrx();
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, Mtrx& m);

#endif /* MTRX_H_ */

//Mtrx.cpp

//...
//...
Mtrx::~Mtrx(){
delete p;
p = NULL;
}

Mtrx Mtrx::operator+(Mtrx& m){
if(this->getLines() == m.getLines() && this->getCols() == m.getCols()){
    Mtrx res(getLines(),getCols());

    for (int i = 1; i <= this->getLines(); i++){
        for(int j = 1; j <= this->getCols(); j++){
            res.setElement(i,j,(this->getElement(i,j)+m.getElement(i,j)));
        }
    }

    return res;
}
share|improve this question
    
Your iterations from 1..nLines and 1..nCols looks suspicious. Is this intentional or did you mean to start from zero? –  kfmfe04 Feb 26 '13 at 2:16
    
Can you paste your main() as well? operator+ looks OK. –  Amar Feb 26 '13 at 3:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a destructor but you're missing a copy constructor and an assignment operator. As a rule of thumb if you have any of them you should have all of them.

Mtrx(const Mtrx&);
Mtrx& operator=(const Mtrx&);
~Mtrx();

Without an explicit copy constructor the compiler will generate one for you. It's not smart, though, so it doesn't know to allocate new memory for p when it copies a matrix. It just copies the pointer, resulting in the original matrix and the copy both referring to the same memory. Both of them will call delete p when their destructor runs which is bad news bears for the second guy.

This is exactly what happens when operator+ returns and res is copied.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this seems to be exaclty the problem. I am a C++ beginner, so I am having difficulties implementing the Rule of Three. After hours and hours I established that my new assignment operator and destrucor are working but my copy constructor still doesn't. :( Mtrx::Mtrx(const Mtrx& m){ cout<<"Copy Constructor called!"<<endl; lines = m.lines; cols = m.cols; p = new float*[lines]; for(int i = 0; i < m.lines; i++){ for(int j = 0; j < m.cols; j++){ cout<<"Copy constructor reached this point."<< endl; p[i][j] = m.p[i][j]; //dsnt reach here. } } } –  user2109467 Feb 26 '13 at 13:57
    
sorry about the formatting, I'm worse at that than I am at C++. –  user2109467 Feb 26 '13 at 14:04

Check your braces. You either are missing one, or your control path for the if(false) isn't returning.

Mtrx Mtrx::operator+(Mtrx& m){
if(this->getLines() == m.getLines() && this->getCols() == m.getCols()){
    Mtrx res(getLines(),getCols());

    for (int i = 1; i <= this->getLines(); i++){
        for(int j = 1; j <= this->getCols(); j++){
            res.setElement(i,j,(this->getElement(i,j)+m.getElement(i,j)));
        }
    }

    return res;
}
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