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So I have a class defines as below:

class InternalRunnable : public Runnable {
private:
  // the thread unit its operating on
  ThreadUnit& unit;

public:
  InternalRunnable(ThreadUnit& unit) : unit(unit) { // marker here
};

g++ compile this fine but with a marker information on constructor as:

Multiple markers at this line
- no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘ThreadUnit* const’ to 
 ‘ThreadUnit&’
- InternalRunnable::InternalRunnable(ThreadUnit&)

Which looks quite confusing to me because I see the above totally valid. Can you kindly explain to me what's the problem?

My environment is Eclipse + g++ 4.7.2.

Basically I want to create a non-modifiable reference to ThreadUnit and initialize it with constructor.

Thanks in advance.

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closed as too localized by WhozCraig, Potatoswatter, jogojapan, Sankar Ganesh, Yan Sklyarenko Feb 26 '13 at 8:04

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3  
How do you call the constructor? –  jogojapan Feb 26 '13 at 2:24
1  
Did you hit save before compiling? Looks like it is complaining about code at a constructor call site, not the actual constructor itself. –  Brian Neal Feb 26 '13 at 2:33
1  
You seemed to have missed a closing brace for the constructor body (assuming the body of the constructor is empty). In addition, where is the code which calls this constructor ? –  Tuxdude Feb 26 '13 at 2:42
    
Right - I got the problem. Only because I didn't rebuild everything and jogojapan is correct - I forgot to change the methods calling the constructor. D'oh! –  Alex Suo Feb 26 '13 at 3:18

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