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I am thinking of re-using my phonegap html, css and js code as a web app. I would be going through and removing any mobile only functionalities.

The purpose is to have a web app which offers some of the mobile apps functionality, I use very little mobile device features currently. But I am guessing maintaining with each release of my mobile app code will be troublesome.

Any of you guys tried this before ? Any tips ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With a responsive design your phonegap code should run on almost any device. It's important to know what it is running on (both device and OS) so you can respond accordingly. I build a window.deviceInfo object up front with the following information:

  • window.deviceInfo.type: handheld, tablet, desktop
  • window.deviceInfo.brand: ios, android, microsoft, webos, blackberry
  • window.deviceInfo.mode: browser, standalone, webview
  • window.deviceInfo.mobile: true, false 
  • window.deviceInfo.phonegap: true, false

I use a single container <div> called viewport to create my responsive container and size it based on the device it's on.

Demo: jsFiddle

This is the initialization code to set everything up:

initializeEnvironment();
initializeDimensions();
initializePhoneGap( function () {
   //start app  
} );

First I set up window.deviceInfo.

function initializeEnvironment() {
    //window.deviceInfo.type: handheld, tablet, desktop
    //window.deviceInfo.brand: ios, android, microsoft, webos, blackberry
    //window.deviceInfo.mode: browser, standalone, webview
    //window.deviceInfo.mobile: true, false 
    //window.deviceInfo.phonegap: true, false 

    var userAgent = window.navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase();
    window.deviceInfo = {};

    if ( /ipad/.test( userAgent ) || ( /android/.test( userAgent ) && !/mobile/.test( userAgent ) ) ) {
        window.deviceInfo.type = 'tablet';
    } else if ( /iphone|ipod|webos|blackberry|android/.test( userAgent ) ) {
        window.deviceInfo.type = 'handheld';
    } else {
        window.deviceInfo.type = 'desktop';
    };

    if ( /iphone|ipod|ipad/.test( userAgent ) ) {
        var safari = /safari/.test( userAgent );
        window.deviceInfo.brand = 'ios';
        if ( window.navigator.standalone ) {
            window.deviceInfo.mode = 'standalone';
        } else if ( safari ) {
            window.deviceInfo.mode = 'browser';
        } else if ( !safari ) {
            window.deviceInfo.mode = 'webview';
        };
    } else if ( /android/.test( userAgent ) ) {
        window.deviceInfo.brand = 'android';
        window.deviceInfo.mode = 'browser';
    } else if ( /webos/.test( userAgent ) ) {
        window.deviceInfo.brand = 'webos';
        window.deviceInfo.mode = 'browser';
    } else if ( /blackberry/.test( userAgent ) ) {
        window.deviceInfo.brand = 'blackberry';
        window.deviceInfo.mode = 'browser';
    } else {
        window.deviceInfo.brand = 'unknown';
        window.deviceInfo.mode = 'browser';
    };
    window.deviceInfo.mobile = ( window.deviceInfo.type == 'handheld' || window.deviceInfo.type == 'tablet' );
};

Then I resize the viewport and anything else that needs it. Mobile devices use window.innerWidth and window.innerHeight to take up the full screen.

function initializeDimensions() {
    var viewport = document.getElementById( 'viewport' );
    if ( window.deviceInfo.mobile ) {
        viewport.style.width = window.innerWidth + 'px';
        viewport.style.height = window.innerHeight + 'px';
    } else {
        //requirements for your desktop layout may be different than full screen
        viewport.style.width = '300px';
        viewport.style.height = '300px';
    };
    //set individual ui element sizes here
};

Finally, I use window.device (note this is not the same as the deviceInfo object I create) to verify if phonegap is available and ready. Instead of relying on the finicky deviceready event, I poll that object when my code is running on a device that should be running phonegap. When the initializePhoneGap() callback is called, the app is ready to start.

Throughout the app, I wrap phonegap features in if( window.deviceInfo.phonegap ) {}.

function initializePhoneGap( complete ) {
    if ( window.deviceInfo.brand == 'ios' && window.deviceInfo.mode != 'webview' ) {
        window.deviceInfo.phonegap = false;
        complete();
    } else if ( window.deviceInfo.mobile ) {
        var timer = window.setInterval( function () {
            if ( window.device ) {
                window.deviceInfo.phonegap = true;
                complete();
            };
        }, 100 );
        window.setTimeout( function () { //failsafe
            if ( !window.device ) { //in webview, not in phonegap or phonegap failed
                window.clearInterval( timer );
                window.deviceInfo.phonegap = false;
                complete();
            };
        }, 5000 ); //fail after 5 seconds
    } else {
        window.deviceInfo.phonegap = false;
        complete();
    };
};
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This might help me in future ! Thanks !! :) –  AnhSirk Dasarp Feb 26 '13 at 5:00
    
What a fantastic answer! This looks like exactly what I need :D –  Joel Murphy Apr 21 at 10:01

We are developing an iPad app and deployed it as a mobile website too. Whenever PhoneGap specific calls are made, using a common method called isRunningOnPhoneGap() (returns false if the code is running as website) , we decide whether to invoke the PhoneGap feature or to display the web feature. This is how we decide if the app is running as a website or on a mobile device.

var isRunningOnPhoneGap: function () {

        if ((document.URL.indexOf('http://') === -1) && (document.URL.indexOf('https://') === -1)) {
            if (navigator.userAgent.match(/(iPhone|iPod|iPad|Android|BlackBerry)/)) {
                return true;
            } else {

                return false;
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }
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Were you able to get this app approved through Apple? –  zachzurn May 1 '13 at 19:07
    
This app is an enterprise app and it is not going through app store. I dont see any reason why apple would reject an app with this code. –  Whizkid747 May 1 '13 at 19:43
    
OK, thanks. Just curious. –  zachzurn May 1 '13 at 19:45

Yes it will work.I have tried the vice-versa of your requirement.Including the cordova js file works but with some functionalities not supported.But you will definitely get the basic ones.

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