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I am doing Huffman encoding and I am having trouble understanding how to use fwrite() to write our encodings to the output.

Let's say I have these encodings:

Character A (65) gets an encoding of 101
Character B (66) gets an encoding of 1100111

But, these encodings get saved as integers, so

101 actually has a decimal value of 5 which is saved in memory as 00000101
1100111 actually has a decimal value of 103 which is saved in memory as 01100111

So, when we want to write them out using fwrite(), let's say we use a buffer

int buff[4]

which starts as

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

(using X to denote uninitialized) Why do we use 4 bytes? Because we need to account for really long encodings. What if we have an encoding that is 27 bits long? we'll need to completely fill three of those bytes and a bit of the fourth.

Now, let's say we need to encode this series of characters and write them to the output file:

"ABB"

first, we encode A, and our buff[] should become:

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
101XXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

Then, we need to encode B, so our buff[] should become:

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
10111001 - 11XXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

Now, one byte of buff[] is full, so we need to encode that byte and shift the other slots of buff[] down

fwrite(buff[0], 1, 1, fptOutput);
/* insert code to shift buff down */

So now our buff becomes:

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
11XXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

Next, we encode another "B", our buff[] becomes:

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
11110011 - 1XXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

Then, we fwrite() buff[0] again and do the shift again.

But, we don't have anything else to encode, so we have to fill in the rest of the byte with 0s, so our buff is now:

buff[0]    buff[1]    buff[2]    buff[3]
10000000 - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX - XXXXXXXX

And fwrite that last byte and then we're done.

The problem is that I have absolutely no clue how to systematically program that. I understand bit manipulation. For example, on our first "A" encoding, we'll need to shift "00000101" to the left 5 spots so it becomes "101-----", and I understand that step, but then I don't know how to keep track of where to shift our next encoding.

If I am doing it by hand, I can figure out how to shift each variable as we need it, but I don't know how to come up with a series of equations that will work for every series of encodings in a very long file.

share|improve this question
2  
basically you just append each char's encoding into your temp array, once you get at least 8 bits worth of encoded data, you write out those 8 bits, shift the remainder over by 8, then continue appending, until you get another full byte. rinse, repeat. for efficiency's sake, you migth want to use a buffer larger than 4 bytes, because writing out a large file a byte at a time is painfully slow. – Marc B Feb 26 '13 at 4:55

You need to store an array of the encodings for each character along with an array for the number of bits in each characters encoding because they will all be different.

Then you need to keep track of how many bits are left in your buff array.

Then everytime you want to add a character, you copy that characters encoding into another temporary buffer. Then you shift that encoding up by the number of bits already left in your buff array. Then you bitwise OR your shifted encoding onto your buff array.

Then you write data from your buff array and shift the remaining buff data down and adjust the count of the bits left in the buff array.

The following is a function for bitwise shifting an array of 16 bit ints (short ints) up or down. It is a bit of overkill because it will shift bits up or down. You can modify it to work on bytes or longs:

void 
shiftBits(unsigned short int *buffer, int bufferSize, int bitsToShiftUp)
{
int wordsToShift;
int bitsToShift;
int backBitsToShift;
int iTo;
int iFrom;

if (bitsToShiftUp > 0)
{
    //Shift up
    wordsToShift = bitsToShiftUp / 16;
    bitsToShift = bitsToShiftUp - (wordsToShift * 16);

    iTo = bufferSize - 1;
    iFrom = iTo - wordsToShift;

    if (bitsToShift == 0)
    {
        while (iFrom >= 0)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = buffer[iFrom];
            iTo--;
            iFrom--;
        }
        while (iTo >= 0)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = 0;
            iTo--;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        backBitsToShift = 16 - bitsToShift;
        while (iFrom >= 1)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = (buffer[iFrom] << bitsToShift) | (buffer[iFrom-1] >> backBitsToShift);
            iTo--;
            iFrom--;
        }
        if (iFrom >= 0)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = buffer[iFrom] << bitsToShift;
            iTo--;
        }
        while (iTo >= 0)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = 0;
            iTo--;
        }
    }
}
else if (bitsToShiftUp  < 0)
{
    //Shift down
    wordsToShift = (-bitsToShiftUp) / 16;
    bitsToShift = (-bitsToShiftUp) - (wordsToShift * 16);

    iTo = 0;
    iFrom = wordsToShift;

    if (bitsToShift == 0)
    {
        while (iFrom < bufferSize)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = buffer[iFrom];
            iTo++;
            iFrom++;
        }
        while (iTo < bufferSize)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = 0;
            iTo++;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        backBitsToShift = 16 - bitsToShift;
        while (iFrom < bufferSize - 1)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = (buffer[iFrom] >> bitsToShift) | (buffer[iFrom+1] << backBitsToShift);
            iTo++;
            iFrom++;
        }
        if (iFrom < bufferSize)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = buffer[iFrom] >> bitsToShift;
            iTo++;
        }
        while (iTo < bufferSize)
        {
            buffer[iTo] = 0;
            iTo++;
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
btw, you can't just terminate with a bunch of zeros because one or more zeros can be a valid code in huffman coding. You either need to store the size of your data (in bits) or introduce a specific termination encoding. – Craig Neil Brown Feb 26 '13 at 5:48

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