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Im trying to test a java generic class that i wrote, this is my test

public class BSTTest
    {
    public void testInsert()
    {
    int height;
    BST<int> myTree = new BST<int>();
    myTree.insert(1);
    }

} 

but when i compile i get the error of unexpected type, it says if found an int but requires a reference on the line of BST myTree = new BST(); what does that mean?

below are my Binary search tree and node class for reference

public class BST<E extends Comparable<E>>
{
public Node<E> root;


public BST()
{
    root = null;
}
//insert delete find height
public void find(E s, Node<E> n)
{
    //empty tree, root is null
    if(n == null)
    {
        System.out.println("Item not present.");
    }
    //n is the node where s is, return n
    else if(n.getData().equals(s))
    {
        System.out.println("Item present");
    }
    //s is greater than n, look for s on the right subtree
    else if(s.compareTo(n.getData()) > 0)
    {
        find(s, n.getRight());
    }
    //s is less than n, look for s on the left subtree
    else
    {
        find(s, n.getLeft());
    }
}

public int height() 
{
    int count;
    return count = height(root); 
}

private int height(Node<E> n)
{
    int ct = 0;
    if(n == null)
    {

    }

    else
    {

        int left = height(n.getLeft());

        int right = height(n.getRight());

        ct = Math.max(left, right) + 1;
    }
    return ct;
} 

public void insert(E s) 
{
    root = insert(s, root);
} 

private Node<E> insert(E s, Node<E> T)
{
    //easiest case, empty tree, create new tree
    if(T == null)
    {
        T = new Node<E>(s,null,null);
    }
    //easiest case, found s
    else if(s.compareTo(T.getData()) == 0)
    {
        System.out.println("Item already present.");
    }
    //s is greater than T, insert on right subtree
    else if(s.compareTo(T.getData()) > 0)
    {
        T.setRight(insert(s, T.getRight()));
    }
    //s is less than T, insert on left subtree
    else
    {
        T.setLeft(insert(s,T.getLeft()));
    }
    return T;
}

public void delete(E d)
{
}

}

and my node class

public class Node<E> 
{
   private E data;
private Node<E> left;
private Node<E> right;
private Node<E> parent;

   public  Node(E d, Node<E> r, Node<E> l) 
{
  data = d;

    left = l;
    right = r; 
   }
   public void setData(E d) 
{
  data = d;
   }
public E getData()
{
    return data;
}
   public Node<E> getRight() 
{
  return right;
   }
public void  setRight(Node<E> nd)
{
    right = nd;
}
   public Node<E> getLeft()
{
    return left;
}
public void  setLeft(Node<E> nd)
{
    left = nd;
}
public Node<E> getParent()
{
    return parent;
}
public void  setParent(Node<E> nd)
{
    parent = nd;
}
}
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4 Answers 4

Can you try Integer instead of int?

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that worked, thanks –  alexthefourth Feb 26 '13 at 7:19
    
+1 your answer is indeed correct. it'd be great if you add explanation thou –  PermGenError Feb 26 '13 at 7:20
    
Thanks for comment. int is primitive type and Integer is object. In java generic can't be primitive type, only objects. –  Epsilon Feb 26 '13 at 7:26

Generic type takes only Classes (Object types) and not the primite data type
It should be

BST<Integer> myTree = new BST<Integer>();
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Java generics are only for Object types. Since, int is a primitive type you cannot use it. Instead use BST<Integer>

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You can't use a primitive type like int as a parameter to a generic class in Java. It has to be a class type, such as Integer.

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