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I read in another question that i can not find now that it was a bad idea to make modules in node.js global, then he changed his answer because of changes in node.js

The examples for express.js on github does now show an example. https://github.com/visionmedia/express/tree/master/examples

So what if i need the same module in multiple files, like sequelize or async?

app.js:

var document = require('./routes/document')
async = require('async');

/routes/document.js:

async.series([...]);

OR

app.js:

var document = require('./routes/document')
var async = require('async');

/routes/document.js:

var async = require('async');
async.series([...]);

Should i require the async module again in document.js, or just make async global so that i can use it without require it in new files?

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3 Answers 3

Do not use globals to access modules. Always use require and only require() the modules you need in that .js file. Require will only load your module once and hold a reference to it.

Only requiring what you need, even if it's several modules, is good because it makes it clear what the dependencies of your code are and might help you restructure your code later.

Only requiring() what you need can also help at the point where you want to replace one module with another. For example, you might want to replace knox(S3) with the new aws-sdk module. When you remove the knox npm module, require will immediately blow up in the files that use/require knox. If it was a global variable, you would need to find all references to that global reference and rely on your IDE or text editor to find it.

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There is nothing wrong with requiring a module more than once. Internally require only executes the required file once and then caches the result. See the Node.js Modules documentation for more information.

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In short, include it in each file. The file is cached after the first require, so the content is really only run once (you can test this by putting a log statement in the require; it'll only show once).

What I do is make one file which requires all the others I need, and exports them all. Then you only need to require the one file. This can be really handy when you have many modules that you're including.

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