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I have this directory structure

./bin/<java class files>
./sometool/bin/<files for the tool>

...as well as some other files and directories.

It seens that if I want to avoid tracking the java class files, I should add this to the .gitignore file:

bin/

However, it appears that this also ignores the path ./sometool/bin

Is that correct, and if so, how do I get the behavior I want.

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marked as duplicate by CharlesB, hauleth, Daniel Hilgarth, Simon, guerda Mar 12 '13 at 13:13

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think paths in .gitignore have their root at the project's root, so you may try /bin

EDIT

And by the way, this is normal behaviour from git.

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8  
not entirely correct, but quite so. paths in .gitignore have their root at the folder containing the .gitignore (you can have one .gitignore per folder if you want). So putting a .gitignore with contents /bin will make it ignore files or folders named bin in th esame folder as the .gitignore. If you want to specify that bin should be a folder, then put a trailing slash. To sum it up, using /bin/ will ignore only the bin folder in the same folder of the .gitignore file. –  Carlos Campderrós Feb 26 '13 at 9:12
    
Thanks for the clarification, always good to learn things right. –  Romain Sertelon Feb 26 '13 at 9:15

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