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I'm trying to design and build a ruby gem for dealing with command line tools programmatically. The use case is in rake tasks, deployment recipes, etc: instead of building a string to be executed by the shell, I would like to create objects and call methods on them.

I've already done something like that, but the support for options is limited. I support "valued" options (outputs as --option_name 'value') and "singular" options (as --option). I have no support for "short" arguments (though I'm not sure it is needed, since every option is supposed to be available in long format). Right now the command string results in something like toolname --option1 --option2 --option3 'value' arg1 arg2.

I would like to know if the assumptions are making here are false (options before, long version always starting with --, valued options not needing an equal sign, etc), and any other relevant advice.

I'm not looking to make a tool that will fit every case and every need, I'd rather have it suit 80% of the cases and be easy to use, rather to cover everything and be bloated. My use cases will be web development toolchain softwares, so databases (mysql, mongodb, redis) cli interfaces, unix utilities (grep, tar, etc), and others as git, heroku..

Thanks for taking the time to read this!

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You might want to look at Thor –  Andy Waite Feb 26 '13 at 10:36
    
It seems to me that I want to achieve the opposite of what thor does. I don't want to create a cli tool backed by an OO-script, I want to create an OO wrapper around already existing cli tools. –  ksol Feb 26 '13 at 17:04
    
You're right, I skimmed the question too quickly! –  Andy Waite Feb 26 '13 at 18:00
    
possible duplicate of Pattern for Wrapping Shell Commands in a Class –  Paul Sweatte Apr 30 at 23:58

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