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Please tell me why the first code is giving wrong answer but second code is giving the correct answer. Although there is only one difference in the codes that I used unsigned long int in the second code but long long int in the first code. Please click here for the problem statement (question) http://www.codechef.com/problems/COINS

First Code:

#include<stdio.h>
long long int a[100000]={0};
long long fun(long long int x);
int main()
{
    long long int x;
    while(scanf("%lld",&x)!=EOF)
    {
        printf("%lld\n",fun(x));
    }
    return 0;
}

long long fun(long long int x)
{
    if(x<11)
    {
        //a[x]=x;
        return x;
}
    if(x<100000&&a[(int)x]!=0)
        return a[(int)x];
    else
    {
        long int t=fun(x/2)+fun(x/3)+fun(x/4);
        if(t>x) 
        {   
            if(x<100000)
                a[(int)x]=t;
            return t;
        }
        else
        {
            if(x<100000)
                a[(int)x]=x;
            return x;
        }
    }


}    

Second Code:

#include<stdio.h>
long unsigned int a[100000]={0};
long unsigned fun(long unsigned int x);
int main()
{
    long unsigned int x;
    while(scanf("%lu",&x)!=EOF)
    {
        printf("%lu\n",fun(x));
    }
return 0;
}

long unsigned fun(long unsigned int x)
{
    if(x<11)
    {
        //a[x]=x;
        return x;
    }
    if(x<100000&&a[(int)x]!=0)
        return a[(int)x];
    else
    {
        long int t=fun(x/2)+fun(x/3)+fun(x/4);
        if(t>x) 
        {   
            if(x<100000)
                a[(int)x]=t;
            return t;
        }
        else
        {
            if(x<100000)
                a[(int)x]=x;
            return x;
        }
    }


}                 
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closed as not a real question by Oli Charlesworth, PlasmaHH, sgar91, Ethan Hunt, Sankar Ganesh Feb 27 '13 at 6:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I would never advice you to use printf and scanf for long long on competitions. It is usually explicitly stated to prefer cin and cout to these fucntions. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 26 '13 at 9:40
    
What is the right answer and what is the wrong answer? –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '13 at 9:40
1  
@IvayloStrandjev Why ? –  cnicutar Feb 26 '13 at 9:41
    
@OliCharlesworth this is a competetive problem. You only know you have a wrong answer but not the test. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Feb 26 '13 at 9:41
    
@IvayloStrandjev: oh, then this is not a good question for SO... –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 26 '13 at 9:42
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1 Answer

The problem is the line

long int t=fun(x/2)+fun(x/3)+fun(x/4);

Everything is fine there if long is a 64-bit type, but not if it's a 32-bit type - as it apparently is on the testing machines.

The first point where a signed 32-bit integer overflows is

509607936:        2173680735

The overflow of signed integers is undefined behaviour, but the most common thing to happen here is wrap-around, resulting in a negative value for t.

When the type of x is long long int, for the comparison t > x, t is converted to long long int without changing its value. So t > x is false (since t < 0 < x), although it should be true.

When the type of x is unsigned long, as in the second code, t is converted to unsigned long for the comparison. With 32-bit unsigned longs, that conversion results in the correct value (if indeed the overflow manifests as wrap-around, and the representation of signed integers is two's complement).

You should let t have the type that fun returns, then the code will work with both, long long and unsigned long, whether long and unsigned long are 32 bits wide or wider.

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