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Generally, as java developers all know that we must use "synchronized" to control the method execution one by one, but I see the following code choose static variable to control, and i can't simulate the condition to demonstrate that the method is error, how do I modify the code to output the value more than 1000?

public class ThreadJunk implements Runnable{
    private Info info;
    public ThreadJunk(Info info) {
        this.info = info;
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {

        for(int j=0;j<100;j++) {
            Info ii = new Info();
            for(int i=0;i<1000;i++) {
                Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadJunk(ii));
                t.start();
            }
            System.out.println(ii.getValue());
        }
    }
    @Override
    public void run() {
        info.addValue();
    }
}

class Info {
    public static boolean IS_LOCKED = false;
    private int value = 0;
    public void addValue() {
        if(IS_LOCKED)
            return;
        IS_LOCKED = true;
        value++;
        IS_LOCKED = false;
    }
    public int getValue() {
        return value;
    }
}

In my computer, I have never get the result that more than 1000

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I'd use a static SimpleDateFormat instance accessed in more than two threads. One of the threads should write to the System.out, triggered always with the same input date (I'd advise 28th of February of any year for that purpose), while the other threads use constantly use the same instance to convert random dates. That is quite a spectacular demonstration about why not to use non-thread safe objects in multithreaded environments carelessly... –  ppeterka Feb 26 '13 at 9:52
1  
@ppeterka Why post that as a comment? It's a good answer. –  Duncan Feb 26 '13 at 9:54
    
@DuncanJones Right now I don't have the resources to turn this into a full-fledged answer... But I'll do it when I find a timeslot - and no one else did it... –  ppeterka Feb 26 '13 at 10:02

2 Answers 2

Look at this part of your code:

Info ii = new Info();
for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadJunk(ii));
    t.start();
}

For every Info object you are creating no more than 1000 threads. You should not expect the value field to get incremented more than 1000 times.

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Exactly. In addition, there is also a race condition: the value is retrieved with ii.getValue() without ensuring that all threads are finished. That is why (at least on my env) the number printed is sometimes lower than 1000 –  Andreas Feb 26 '13 at 10:00
    
That seems like what's happening. –  Nishant Shreshth Feb 26 '13 at 10:03
    
if(IS_LOCKED) return; this code indicate that two thread may execute the following code at the same time –  dan zen Feb 26 '13 at 10:51

Info object has value as member variable.And one Info object is shared in 999 threads as per your thread creation logic.

 for(int j=0;j<100;j++) {
            Info ii = new Info();
            for(int i=0;i<1000;i++) {
                Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadJunk(ii));
                t.start();
            }
            System.out.println(ii.getValue());
        }

Hence obviously following would be never greater than 1000.

System.out.println(ii.getValue())
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