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I have an application which involves sound pool - On start of the application all the sounds are loaded after which main screen is loaded.

Now, I would like to check if the application is running - if is not running I would like to reload the application - if it is running I don't want reload the application.

For which I tried the following:

 ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) this.getSystemService( ACTIVITY_SERVICE );
 List<RunningAppProcessInfo> procInfos = activityManager.getRunningAppProcesses();
 for(int i = 0; i < procInfos.size(); i++){
   if(procInfos.get(i).processName.equals("com.me.checkprocess"))
   {
    Log.e("Result", "App is running - Doesn't need to reload");
   }
   else
   {
     Log.e("Result", "App is not running - Needs to reload);
  }
}

This gives the results out perfectly but keeps on checking until procInfos.size is lesser that 0. Until the app gets process com.me.checkprocess true - it is always false? so it always gets into the else part first.

So for example: If the total process is 30. And my process com.me.checkprocess is running @29th. When execute the condition. Until 28th process it is else and @29th process it gets into the condition true.

How to fix this part - I would like to get to else part only after total process is checked?

Let me know!

share|improve this question
2  
Use break; statement. –  Harry Joy Feb 26 '13 at 9:52
    
Missing quote at end of this line Log.e("Result", "App is not running - Needs to reload); –  Pratik Butani Nov 18 '13 at 12:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think you can just add

break;

below

Log.e("Result", "App is running - Doesn't need to reload");

in if statement

share|improve this answer

Just put an break inside the for-loop.

 for(...){
    if(){
       break;
    } 
 }

This is definitely not clean, but does the thing you want.

**EDIT 2

I think it would be easier if you just extract this task in a method.

public boolean isProcessRunning(String process)
{
   ActivityManager activityManager = (ActivityManager) this.getSystemService( ACTIVITY_SERVICE );
   List<RunningAppProcessInfo> procInfos = activityManager.getRunningAppProcesses();
   for(int i = 0; i < procInfos.size(); i++){
      if(procInfos.get(i).processName.equals(process)) {
         return true;
      }  
   }

   return false;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
   if(isProcessRunning("my_process")){
      //Do what you need
   }
   else{
      //restart your app
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Then what is the cleaner way? –  Harry Joy Feb 26 '13 at 9:55
    
@HarryJoy "clean" is subjective. I would prefer the break over a complicated termination condition or a construction with a boolean variable. –  Henry Feb 26 '13 at 9:58
    
@Henry yeah I got your point, but actually I was honestly asking if c4pone also has some more cleaner way to do this then break. –  Harry Joy Feb 26 '13 at 10:07
    
@HarryJoe, i updated my answer –  c4pone Feb 26 '13 at 10:13
    
yes, I saw that. Thanks for sharing it. It's always good to provide a better way to do the thing in answer. And the name is Harry Joy ;P –  Harry Joy Feb 26 '13 at 10:22

This is what you should be doing.

   if(procInfos.get(i).processName.equals("com.me.checkprocess"))
   {
    Log.e("Result", "App is running - Doesn't need to reload");
    break;
   }
share|improve this answer

The other listed answers will work, but I agree with c4pone - in a loop such as this, break seems like a bad way to do it - especially as using a break means that if you add another condition around your if statement, there's a chance that the break may no longer function in exiting the for loop - in some ways it's analogous to a goto statement in other languages

Another alternative to your problem is this:

for(int i = 0; i < procInfos.size(); i++){
   if(procInfos.get(i).processName.equals("com.me.checkprocess"))
   {
        Log.e("Result", "App is running - Doesn't need to reload");
        i = procInfos.size();
   }
   else
   {
        Log.e("Result", "App is not running - Needs to reload);
   }
}

Which will also break the loop, as it sets your counter variable to the termination clause, meaning once it's found, the loop will exit.

EDIT:

After the OP's comment below, I have a feeling that the solution he wants is this:

boolean found = false;
for(int i = 0; i < procInfos.size(); i++){
   if(procInfos.get(i).processName.equals("com.me.checkprocess"))
   {
       found = true;
   }
}

if(found)
{
    Log.e("Result", "App is running - Doesn't need to reload");
    i = procInfos.size();
}
else
{
    Log.e("Result", "App is not running - Needs to reload);
}

Which is nothing to do with exiting the loop prematurely, as all of us thought from reading the question, but is instead to only output the result once

share|improve this answer
    
Again. This goes directly to else part first and then goes to if part. So for example if the total process is 30.. and "com.me.checkprocess" is running on 29th - till 28th the app will go to else part ("needs to reload") and then @29th it will say true doesn't need to reload. –  TheDevMan Feb 26 '13 at 10:48
    
Of course it will. At this point I'm suspecting that you've not worded your original question well at all. Do you want the else clause to only execute once? If so, I've edited my answer to give you a solution –  Matt Taylor Feb 26 '13 at 10:50
    
Yep. The condition is like that. Sorry for wrong communication. I have also edited the question properly. else part should occur only when the process is not there. Not everytime it goes in the process. My code or your code always goes to else part then goes to if part. –  TheDevMan Feb 26 '13 at 10:53
    
Check out my updated code, that should solve your problem –  Matt Taylor Feb 26 '13 at 10:54
1  
TBH, it seems to me that your check is a bit pointless - if the app is getting to this point in code, it must be running. I don't know anything about your app, but it seems to me you really want to be checking that your sound files exist, which is an entirely different check –  Matt Taylor Feb 26 '13 at 11:34

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