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Following code gives different output in Python2 and in Python3:

from sys import version

print(version)

def execute(a, st):
    b = 42
    exec("b = {}\nprint('b:', b)".format(st))
    print(b)
a = 1.
execute(a, "1.E6*a")

Python2 prints:

2.7.2 (default, Jun 12 2011, 15:08:59) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
('b:', 1000000.0)
1000000.0

Python3 prints:

3.2.3 (default, Apr 11 2012, 07:15:24) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
b: 1000000.0
42

Why does Python2 bind the variable b inside the execute function to the values in the string of the exec function, while Python3 doesn't do this? How can I achieve the behaviour of Python2 in Python3? I already tried to pass dictionaries for globals and locals to exec function in Python3, but nothing worked so far.

--- EDIT ---

After reading Martijns answer I further analyzed this with Python3. In following example I give the locals() dictionay as d to exec, but d['b'] prints something else than just printing b.

from sys import version

print(version)

def execute(a, st):
    b = 42
    d = locals()
    exec("b = {}\nprint('b:', b)".format(st), globals(), d)
    print(b)                     # This prints 42
    print(d['b'])                # This prints 1000000.0
    print(id(d) == id(locals())) # This prints True
a = 1.
execute(a, "1.E6*a")

3.2.3 (default, Apr 11 2012, 07:15:24) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
b: 1000000.0
42
1000000.0
True

The comparison of the ids of d and locals() shows that they are the same object. But under these conditions b should be the same as d['b']. What is wrong in my example?

share|improve this question
    
print is a statement in Python 2 –  Niklas R Feb 26 '13 at 10:24
    
@NiklasR: But that's not the question here. But so is exec, btw. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 10:28
    
But in 2.7.2 exec as a function seems to work. By now I found out that I can use eval to gain the result I want. But the question stays the same. I also tried this outside a function call. Then both versions do the same. –  Holger Feb 26 '13 at 10:38
    
@Holger: because the way you use it the parenthesis just group the expression, which means that in python 2 they are ignored. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 10:42
    
@Martijn: That would mean that b stays the same in Python2, right? But it is changed with the exec statement or function in Python2 and not in Python3. –  Holger Feb 26 '13 at 10:45
show 5 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a big difference between exec in Python 2 and exec() in Python 3. You are treating exec as a function, but it really is a statement in Python 2.

Because of this difference, you cannot change local variables in function scope. Not even previously declared variables.

locals() only reflects local variables in one direction. The following never worked in either 2 or 3:

def foo():
    a = 'spam'
    locals()['a'] = 'ham'
    print(a)              # prints 'spam'

In Python 2, using the exec statement meant the compiler knew to switch off the local scope optimizations (switching from LOAD_FAST to LOAD_NAME for example, to look up variables in both the local and global scopes). With exec() being a function, that option is no longer available and function scopes are now always optimized.

Moreover, in Python 2, the exec statement explicitly copies all variables found in locals() back to the function locals using PyFrame_LocalsToFast, but only if no globals and locals parameters were supplied.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry Martjin, I already tried that before, but it doesn't work with 3. It still prints 42 for b. –  Holger Feb 26 '13 at 11:03
    
@Holger: Ah, my mistake, let's turn this around. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 11:05
    
@Holger: I get there in the end. I misread your question, I thought you wanted the Python 3 behaviour in Python 2 instead. I was a little too sure of what you were looking for. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 11:09
    
Hello Martijn, I want it the way it is in Python2. Therefore, bshould be 1000000.0 afterwards. See my edit of the question. I have no explanation for this behaviour. –  Holger Feb 26 '13 at 12:07
    
@Holger: I am not paying enough attention it seems; indeed, the behaviour is not correct in both cases. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 13:21
show 3 more comments

I'm afraid I can't explain it exactly, but it basically comes from the fact that b inside the function is local, and exec() appears to assign to the global b. You'll have to declare b to be global inside the function, and inside the exec statement.

Try this:

from sys import version

print(version)

def execute1(a, st):
    b = 42
    exec("b = {}\nprint('b:', b)".format(st))
    print(b)

def execute2(a, st):
    global b
    b = 42
    exec("global b; b = {}\nprint('b:', b)".format(st))
    print(b)

a = 1.
execute1(a, "1.E6*a")
print()
execute2(a, "1.E6*a")
print()
b = 42
exec("b = {}\nprint('b:', b)".format('1.E6*a'))
print(b)

Which gives me

3.3.0 (default, Oct  5 2012, 11:34:49) 
[GCC 4.4.5]
b: 1000000.0
42

b: 1000000.0
1000000.0

b: 1000000.0
1000000.0

You can see that outside the function, the global b is automatically picked up. Inside the function, you're printing the local b.

Note that I would have thought that exec() always uses the global b first, so that in execute2(), you don't need to declare it inside the exec() function. But I find that doesn't work (which is the part I can't explain exactly).

share|improve this answer
    
No, Python 3 does not modify the globals, it uses a non-modifyable locals() instead. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 11:02
    
The OP is looking to modify locals instead, not globals. Your interpretation is, I am afraid, incorrect, nor is your solution. –  Martijn Pieters Feb 26 '13 at 11:12
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