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I've got a nested block of a condition, a for loop and try/catch block to return a tuple:

  val (a, b) = {
    if (...) {
      for (...) {
        try {
          getTuple(conf)
        } catch {
          case e: Throwable => println(...)
        }
      }
      sys.exit
    } else {
      try {
        getTuple(userConf)
      } catch {
        case e: Throwable => println(...); sys.exit
      }
    }
  }

If the if condition matches I would like to try x different conf configurations. When getTuple throws an exception, try the next one. When getTuple does not throw an exception, fill the tuple with the result. getTuple returns the tuple (a,b).

Problem: However, the for loop does not exit when getTuple does not throw an exception. I also tried break but that does not work as it should return the tuple and not just exit the for loop.

How can I get this to work?

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scala only has for comprehension. In infinite loop is near impossible. I your looping through a infinite Stream, maybe! Second the sys.exit call in the if statement after evaluating the for comprehension is misplaced! –  korefn Feb 26 '13 at 10:07
    
The for loop is not infinite, it only loops a couple of times. –  str Feb 26 '13 at 10:08
    
I don't get it. The for loop is not infinite (comment) and However, the for loop never exits (question) seems somewhat contradicting... –  bluenote10 Feb 26 '13 at 10:14
    
Sorry about that, I rephrased that part. –  str Feb 26 '13 at 10:17
    
@str could you please post an approximation of your for loop from which you get the the configurations to test? It would help in finding the correct way to break from the loop. –  pagoda_5b Feb 26 '13 at 10:49

5 Answers 5

Instead of throwing Exception, getTuple should evaluate as a Option[Tuple2[T,U]], it has more meaning and does not break the flow of the program.

This way, you can have a for like this:

val tuples: List[Option[Tuple2[T,U]] = for {
  c <- configs
} yield getTuple(c)

val firstWorkingConfig: Option[Tuples2[T,U]] = tuples.flatten.headOption

// Exit the program if no config is okay
firstWorkingConfig.getOrElse {
  sys.exit
}

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
I would prefer configs.toStream.map(c => getTuple(c)) instead of the for loop here. –  bluenote10 Feb 26 '13 at 12:17
    
Good idea, I thought of Streams but did not came up quickly with a solution so I went by the for comprehension ;) –  Romain Sertelon Feb 27 '13 at 9:41

I'd suggest to use more functional features of Scala instead of dealing with loops and exceptions.

Suppose we have a function that throws an exception on some inputs:

def myfn(x: Double): Double =
  if (x < 0)
    throw new Exception;
  else
    Math.sqrt(x);

We can either refactor it to return Option:

def optMyfn(x: Double): Option[Double] =
  if (x < 0)
    None;
  else
    Some(Math.sqrt(x));

Or if we don't want to (or cannot modify the original code), we can simply wrap it using Exception.Catcher:

def optMyfn(x: Double): Option[Double]
  = scala.util.control.Exception.allCatch.opt(myfn(x));

Now let's have a sequence of numbers and we want to find the first one on which the function succeeds:

val testseq: Seq[Double] = Seq(-3.0, -2.0, 2.0, 4.0, 5.0);

We can use Scala's functional features to apply the function to all the elements and find the first Some result as

testseq.toStream.map(optMyfn _).flatten.headOption

It'd work as well without using toStream, but we'd call optMyfn unnecessarily on all the element, instead of just those we need to find the first successful result - streams make the computation lazy.

(Another option would be to use views, like

testseq.view.map(optMyfn _).collectFirst({ case Some(x) => x })

.)

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The sys.exit call is kinda misplaced in the if statement. It should be inside the catch clause to allow for a return of tupe if try is successful.

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When an exception is thrown, it should just try again and not exit. It should only exit when all possibilities where tried (i.e. leaving the for loop) without success. So the sys.exit is at the correct position. –  str Feb 26 '13 at 10:20
    
The second one yes the first one... No. Also the for loop will continue to loop through even after finding a configuration, A list of type tuples will be the result whereas the expected type is Tuple2 –  korefn Feb 26 '13 at 11:01

If you want to loop until you get a working tuple a while loop makes more sense. The semantics of a for loop is to evalute the body for all elements you are iterating. Since your goal is to stop after the first which satisfies a condition, a while loop seems much more natural. Of course there would be some more functional alternatives, for instance:

  • wrap your getTuple in an Option, where None corresponds to an exception.
  • put the calls to getTuple in some iterable/traversable collection
  • get the first element which is not None

While I was explaining the concept, Romain Sertelon gave a nice example of the idea...

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There is also a maximum number of tries, so a for loop makes sense. Also, the problem would not be different with a while loop. –  str Feb 26 '13 at 10:22
    
A maximal number of tries is not a problem with a while loop, just extends your condition. –  bluenote10 Feb 26 '13 at 10:23

Another solution is to just wrap the whole block into a method and use return like:

  val (a: Type, b: Type) = setup(...)

  def setup(...) : (Type, Type) = {
    if (...) {
      for (...) {
        try {
          return getTuple(...)
        } catch {
          ...
        }
      }
      sys.exit
    } else {
      try {
        return getTuple(...)
      } catch {
        case e: Throwable => println(...); sys.exit
      }
    }
  }

I think I should learn more basics of Scala, but that works now for the moment.

Thanks for your answers.

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