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I have come to understand that some versions of Microsoft OLE DB Provider for SQL Server (mostly on Windows XP) do not support WITH statement. So, I decided to move my SQL statement into a table-valued function, and call it from my application. Now, I'm stuck. How should I use the INSERT INTO statement with WITH? Here's the code I have come with so far, but SQL Server doesn't like it... :-(

CREATE FUNCTION GetDistributionTable 
(
    @IntID int,
    @TestID int,
    @DateFrom datetime,
    @DateTo datetime
)
RETURNS 
@Table_Var TABLE 
(
    [Count] int, 
    Result float
)
AS
BEGIN
INSERT INTO @Table_Var ([Count], Result) WITH T(Result)
     AS (SELECT ROUND(Result - AVG(Result) OVER(), 1)
         FROM RawResults WHERE IntID = @IntID AND DBTestID = @TestID AND Time >= @DateFrom AND Time <= @DateTo)
SELECT COUNT(*) AS [Count],
       Result
FROM   T
GROUP  BY Result

    RETURN 
END
GO
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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can omit the CTE (WITH statement), you can create an inline table valued function that uses subquery:

CREATE FUNCTION GetDistributionTable 
(
    @IntID int,
    @TestID int,
    @DateFrom datetime,
    @DateTo datetime
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
RETURN  
(
    SELECT  COUNT(*) AS [Count],
            Result
    FROM    (
                 SELECT ROUND(Result - AVG(Result) OVER(), 1) Result
                 FROM   RawResults 
                 WHERE  IntID = @IntID 
                 AND    DBTestID = @TestID 
                 AND    Time >= @DateFrom 
                 AND Time <= @DateTo    
    ) t
    GROUP  BY 
            Result
)
GO

If you insist on having CTE, the syntax for the inline table valued function would be:

CREATE FUNCTION GetDistributionTable 
(
    @IntID int,
    @TestID int,
    @DateFrom datetime,
    @DateTo datetime
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
RETURN  
(
    WITH cte AS
    (
        SELECT ROUND(Result - AVG(Result) OVER(), 1) Result
        FROM   RawResults 
        WHERE  IntID = @IntID 
        AND    DBTestID = @TestID 
        AND    Time >= @DateFrom 
        AND Time <= @DateTo    
    )

    SELECT  COUNT(*) AS [Count],
            Result
    FROM    cte
    GROUP  BY 
            Result
)
GO

My advice is to use the inline TVF, not the multiple-statement TVF as the latter can prevent query optimizer in choosing a better execution plan (performance difference explained here)

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If your CTE is recursive you probably won't be able to rewrite it into the subquery form, so the CTE form may be more than a simple matter of taste. Of course, recursive CTEs can throw the optimizer off if you're not careful: <blogs.msdn.com/b/sqlcat/archive/2011/04/28/…; –  MattW May 28 '14 at 14:54

LIKE THIS..

CREATE FUNCTION GetDistributionTable 
(
    @IntID int,
    @TestID int,
    @DateFrom datetime,
    @DateTo datetime
)
RETURNS 
@Table_Var TABLE 
(
    [Count] int, 
    Result float
)
AS
BEGIN
  WITH T 
    AS (    
        select Ticket_Id,COUNT(1) Result from 
        Customer_Survey
        group by MemberID,SiteId,Ticket_Id
   )
  INSERT INTO @Table_Var ([Count], Result)
  SELECT COUNT(*) AS [Count],
       Result
  FROM   T
  GROUP  BY Result
  RETURN 
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
If at all possible one should test both the multi-statement function as you've shown as well as the single-statement RETURNS TABLE function as the latter can be inlined and thus sometimes have much better performance (see link at bottom of Ivan G's answer). However, as usual, it all depends--sometimes, though rarely, it's faster to use the multi-statement function. –  ErikE Jun 24 '13 at 2:46

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