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How can I convert a generic JObject to camelCase plain json string? I've tried with JsonSerializerSettings but doesn't work (Newtonsoft.Json 4.5.11)

[Test]
public void should_convert_to_camel_case()
{
    var serializer = JsonSerializer.Create(new JsonSerializerSettings()
    {
        ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()
    });

    var jo = new JObject();
    jo["CamelCase"] = 1;

    var stringWriter = new StringWriter();
    var writer = new JsonTextWriter(stringWriter);
    serializer.Serialize(writer,jo);

    var serialized = stringWriter.ToString();

    Assert.AreEqual("{\"camelCase\":1}", serialized);
}

UPDATE According to http://json.codeplex.com/workitem/23853 that cannot be done (tnx to @nick_w for the link)

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This question starts from a JObject and wants to work to a camel-cased JSON object. If you are actually starting from an object and want to get to a JObject that is already camelcased, then you can do this:

var serializer = new JsonSerializer()
{
    ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()
};
var jo = JObject.FromObject(someDataContract, serializer);

The resulting 'jo' will be camelcased.

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According to this, when serializing a JObject this way the contract resolver is ignored. Inspired by the workaround on that page, you could do something like this:

var jo = new JObject();
jo["CamelCase"] = 1;

string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(jo);
var jObject = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<ExpandoObject>(json);

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
{
    ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()
};

var serialized = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(jObject, settings);

Assert.AreEqual("{\"camelCase\":1}", serialized);

Edit:

Good point about the Dictionary<string, object>. So doing it this way skips the additional JsonConvert.SerializeObject, but it also mitigates the need for the ExpandoObject, which is important if you are using .NET 3.5.

Dictionary<string, object> jo = new Dictionary<string, object>();
jo.Add("CamelCase", 1);

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings()
{
    ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()
};

var serialized = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(jo, settings);

Assert.AreEqual("{\"camelCase\":1}", serialized);
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1  
don't think serialize + deserialize + serialize is too efficient. – Andrea Balducci Feb 27 '13 at 11:47
1  
as a workaround I've switched from JObject do Dictionary<string, object>. – Andrea Balducci Feb 27 '13 at 11:48
    
@AndreaBalducci See my edit. – nick_w Feb 27 '13 at 19:49

As of this May 8th, 2013 blog post by James Newton-King regarding the 5.0 release of Json.NET, this has been addressed with the addition of "DefaultSettings". The example from that page follows but read the page for details for 3rd party libraries.

// settings will automatically be used by JsonConvert.SerializeObject/DeserializeObject
JsonConvert.DefaultSettings = () => new JsonSerializerSettings
    {
    Formatting = Formatting.Indented,
    ContractResolver = new CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver()
    };

Employee e = new Employee
    {
    FirstName = "Eric",
    LastName = "Example",
    BirthDate = new DateTime(1980, 4, 20, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc),
    Department = "IT",
    JobTitle = "Web Dude"
    };

string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(e);
// {
//   "firstName": "Eric",
//   "lastName": "Example",
//   "birthDate": "1980-04-20T00:00:00Z",
//   "department": "IT",
//   "jobTitle": "Web Dude"
// }
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