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super, super new to Python and programming in general. I have a question that should be simple enough. I'm using a python beginners programming book using Python version 3.1.

I am currently writing out one of the programs in the book and I am learning about how important indentation is when using python so I was fixing those errors I found and then I get to where I put self.size = size and it highlights that self in the code block is invalid syntax but I'm typing this word for word from the manual so I am not sure what I'm doing wrong. Here is the code block:

def _init_(self, x, y, size):
    """ Initialize asteroid sprite. """
    super(Asteroid, self)._init_(
    image = Asteroid.images[size],
    x = x, y = y,
    dx = random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size,
    dy = random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size

    self.size = size 

The problem is that last line, it highlights self as invalid syntax but nothing else... Also one last note, when I put this particular block into the shell and try running it there it also gives me a syntax error but not the same one, it gives me one right after the colon on the first line of this block and highlights that entire blank area with red.....and I can't figure why. I was putting it in shell so it could highlight the self thing and help me, but instead shows me something completely different.

Any help will be greatly appreciated! thanks!

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5  
it should be def __init__, with double underscores, not _init_. – heltonbiker Feb 26 '13 at 11:35
2  
surely you are missing a round bracket, end of the "dy=" line – Vorsprung Feb 26 '13 at 11:36

You forgot to close the parentheses.

Usually, when you forget to close some parentheses, the interpreted points the error as being in the following line:

def _init_(self, x, y, size):
    """ Initialize asteroid sprite. """
    super(Asteroid, self)._init_(    <-- here you have a parentheses opening
        image = Asteroid.images[size],
        x = x, y = y,
        dx = random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size,
        dy = random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size  <-- no more commas here

    self.size = size  <-- first line without a trailing comma OR parentheses: SYNTAX ERROR HERE! (even though the assignment itself is ok)

Perhaps what the book actually meant was this - as Martijn Pieters pointed out, some of the self.__init__ parameters (x and y) are being passed to the parent's __init__ method, for which other parameters are being read elsewhere (image) or created on-the-fly (dx and dy). Finally, one of the parameters (size) is passed only to the instance, in the body of self.__init__, assigning to self.size:

def __init__(self, x, y, size):
    """ Initialize asteroid sprite. """
    super(Asteroid, self)._init_(
        image = Asteroid.images[size],
        x = x,
        y = y,
        dx = (random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size),
        dy = (random.choice([1, -1]) * Asteroid.SPEED * random.random()/size))

    self.size = size

It is important to know that any method (routine defined inside a class) in Python receives a first argument automatically, which is the object instance itself. Although you might call it what you want, self is the universal Python convention for that. So, when you define __init__ and pass selfas first parameter, you can use it throughout this function to refer to the object you are creating. Thus, saying self.x = x means you want the object to have a x attribute, its value being the x argument you passed upon object creation.

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1  
Also, I strongly recommend you to read "Learning Python", from O'Reilly, it has a light language (with lots of silly jokes and references), making you really understand "what's going on" with the way Python works. It has helped me a lot, being by far the most accessible AND complete Python learning resource I've had opportunity to read. – heltonbiker Feb 26 '13 at 11:51
    
Thank you guys for your help so far. I think with the information you guys have provided me I can troubleshoot it now! Its annoying how in programming its always the little things you miss :P. – Orex Feb 26 '13 at 13:03

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