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I need to rename files within subfolders so that the number prefix is three digits long.

The name pattern is: 1 Audio Track.aiff 2 Audio Track.aiff etc...

I have tried to figure out what to do but have so far only managed to get a solid headache.

All help is appreciated.

ps. I did find this subroutine but my scripting skills are sadly lacking to make good use of it.

on add_leading_zeros(this_number, max_leading_zeros)
 set the threshold_number to (10 ^ max_leading_zeros) as integer
 if this_number is less than the threshold_number then
 set the leading_zeros to ""
 set the digit_count to the length of ((this_number div 1) as string)
 set the character_count to (max_leading_zeros + 1) - digit_count
 repeat character_count times
 set the leading_zeros to (the leading_zeros & "0") as string
 end repeat
 return (leading_zeros & (this_number as text)) as string
 else
 return this_number as text
 end if
end add_leading_zeros
share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Let’s break your problem down into steps.

First, you want to retrieve files from the finder. For now, let's just say you have a folder selected and want to apply the script to its enclosed files.

tell application "Finder"
    set theFolder to the selection
    set theFiles to every file of item 1 of theFolder

When you grab the Finder’s selection you get a list, hence item 1. This also gives you the opportunity to broaden it by, say, selecting several folders and using a repeat loop to iterate through them.

Next, we want to go over every file, so let’s set up a loop that calls a function and passes it the filename of the current file we’re looking at as a string:

repeat with aFile in theFiles
    set originalName to the name of aFile
    set newName to my threeDigitPrefix(originalName)

The subroutine we call is a pretty simple one, that starts by breaking the filename string apart and storing it in a list:

set AppleScript's text item delimiters to " "
set splitName to (every text item of originalName) as list

Then we’ll check that the filename started with a number, breaking out of the function if it’s not.

try
    first item of splitName as number
on error
    return "FAILED" -- originalName does not start with a number
end try

Now we assign the existing prefix to a variable and check its length to determine how many zeroes we need to add to the filename:

set thePrefix to the first item of splitName

if the length of thePrefix is 1 then
    set thePrefix to "00" & thePrefix
else if the length of thePrefix is 2 then
    set thePrefix to "0" & thePrefix
end if

Then we place the prefix back into the list containing our broken-up filename, and recombine it and return it to the loop that called it:

set the first item of splitName to thePrefix
return splitName as string

Finally we check that the function did not fail and rename the file with the string that we’ve just got from the function:

if newName is not "FAILED" then
    set the name of aFile to newName
end if

And we’re done. Put it all together and you end up with this:

tell application "Finder"
    set theFolder to the selection
    set theFiles to every file of item 1 of theFolder

    repeat with aFile in theFiles
        set originalName to the name of aFile
        set newName to my threeDigitPrefix(originalName)

        if newName is not "FAILED" then
            set the name of aFile to newName
        end if
    end repeat
end tell

on threeDigitPrefix(originalName)
    set AppleScript's text item delimiters to " "
    set splitName to (every text item of originalName) as list

    try
        first item of splitName as number
    on error
        return "FAILED" -- originalName does not start with a number
    end try

    set thePrefix to the first item of splitName

    if the length of thePrefix is 1 then
        set thePrefix to "00" & thePrefix
    else if the length of thePrefix is 2 then
        set thePrefix to "0" & thePrefix
    end if

    set the first item of splitName to thePrefix
    return splitName as string

end threeDigitPrefix
share|improve this answer
    
This was the lesson I needed to get my head around this whole thing. Applescript is not like anything else I have used in the past so it is much appreciated to get this kind of insight to what is really going on. You sir...are awesome! – Nordanfors Feb 26 '13 at 14:28

Try:

on add_leading_zeros(this_number, max_leading_zeros)
    return (do shell script "printf \"%0" & max_leading_zeros & "d\"" & this_number)
end add_leading_zeros

set xxx to add_leading_zeros(5, 2)

Or to include the text:

on add_leading_zeros(maxPrefix, myString)
    set this_number to (do shell script "grep -Eo ^[0-9]* <<< " & quoted form of myString)
    set extraZeros to maxPrefix - (length of this_number)
    if extraZeros > 0 then
        set myNumber to (do shell script "printf \"%0" & extraZeros & "d\"" & this_number)
        set myText to myNumber & (do shell script " sed 's/^[0-9]*//' <<< " & quoted form of myString)
    end if
end add_leading_zeros

set xxx to "4441 Audio Track.aiff"
set xxx to add_leading_zeros(6, xxx)
share|improve this answer

Here I show you the usage of your sub-routine, I added log statements so you can see how it works. Hope it helps:

set thisFilename to "1 Audio Track.aiff"

log "thisFilename: " & thisFilename
set numberPrefix to (first word of thisFilename) as number
log "numberPrefix as number: " & numberPrefix

set numberPrefixWithLeadingZeros to my add_leading_zeros(numberPrefix, 2)
log "numberPrefixWithLeadingZeros as text: " & numberPrefixWithLeadingZeros

set newFileName to numberPrefixWithLeadingZeros & " Audio Track.aiff"
log newFileName


-- ADDING LEADING ZEROS: place leading zeros (0001, 023, etc.) before a number
-- if the maximum number of leading zeros is set to 2, then the results will range from 001 to 999, and so on.
on add_leading_zeros(this_number, max_leading_zeros)
    set the threshold_number to (10 ^ max_leading_zeros) as integer
    if this_number is less than the threshold_number then
        set the leading_zeros to ""
        set the digit_count to the length of ((this_number div 1) as string)
        set the character_count to (max_leading_zeros + 1) - digit_count
        repeat character_count times
            set the leading_zeros to (the leading_zeros & "0") as string
        end repeat
        return (leading_zeros & (this_number as text)) as string
    else
        return this_number as text
    end if
end add_leading_zeros
share|improve this answer

You could also just use shell scripting:

for f in *.aif; do mv "$f" "$(printf %03d "${f%% *}") ${f#* }"; done

This would search for all files under the current folder:

IFS=$'\n'; for f in $(find "$PWD" -name '*.aif'); do folder=${f%/*}; file=${f##*/}; mv "$f" "$folder/$(printf %03d "${file%% *}") ${file#* }"; done

  • %% deletes the longest pattern from the end, # deletes the shortest pattern from the start
  • IFS=$'\n' sets the input field separators to linefeed instead of space, tab, and linefeed
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That would of course be a pretty elegant solution and presumably a lot more effective. This script will not operate recursively through subfolders right? If not, how would I make it rename all files within all subfolders of the selected folder? – Nordanfors Feb 27 '13 at 8:23
    
@user1047256 I edited the answer. It doesn't work if you have aif files that don't start with numbers though. – user495470 Feb 27 '13 at 9:15
    
This is blazingly fast compared to using Applescript and it works perfectly. Big thanks! – Nordanfors Feb 27 '13 at 9:37
    
I have edited the script slightly to accomodate for a change in workflow. The input files are now numbered 2->n where n is between 7 and 13. – Nordanfors Feb 27 '13 at 14:38
    
Never mind the comment above - see next post instead(too long for comment field...) – Nordanfors Feb 27 '13 at 14:58

I have altered the script to accomodate a change in workflow. I am now renaming mp3 files instead of the aif filetype and also I am prefixing the parent folder name in the new filename.

script looks like this:

IFS=$'\n'; for f in $(find "$PWD" -name '*.mp3'); do folder=${f%/*}; file=${f##*/}; mv "$f" "$folder/${folder##*/}$(printf %03d "${file%% *}") ${file#* } " ;done

However I have run into trouble. There seems to be an issue (under certain conditions!) if a folder contain more than 10 files.

I have set up two test cases using two different filetypes .docx files and .mp3 files. The test case is basically 10 subfolders with 10 files in each. The files are named according to the pattern: N Audio Track.xxx and are sequentially numbered 1-10. I seem to get some strange results. In the case with .docx files I get a correct result but if I set up the exact same folder and file structure using mp3 files I get strange results in all folders with 10+ files. I get a file renamed to 000 Audio Track.mp3 which is weird and also the files that should be 008 and 009 are not there. I am completely clueless as to what may cause this.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't it funny how you always seem to work things out yourself as soon as you ask for help? I found the culprit and it turns out, unsurprisingly, that I am the culprit. I had unknowingly added a leading zero on some files and didn't actually notice until I took a break and came back with fresh eyes. Duh! – Nordanfors Feb 27 '13 at 15:29

I would go for much a simpler solution:

on add_leading_zeros(this_number, max_leading_zeros)
    return text (max_leading_zeros * -1) thru -1 of ("00000000000000000" & this_number)
end add_leading_zeros
share|improve this answer

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