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Suppose that the scenario doesn't allow to implement an immutable type. Following that assumption, I'd like opinions / examples on how to properly design a type that after it's consumed, becomes immutable.

public class ObjectAConfig {

  private int _valueB;
  private string _valueA;
  internal bool Consumed { get; set; }

  public int ValueB {
    get { return _valueB; }
    set
    {
      if (Consumed) throw new InvalidOperationException();
      _valueB = value;
    }
  }

  public string ValueA {
    get { return _valueA; }
    set
    {
      if (Consumed) throw new InvalidOperationException();
      _valueA = value;
    }
  }
}

When ObjectA consumes ObjectAConfig:

public ObjectA {

  public ObjectA(ObjectAConfig config) {

    _config = config;
    _config.Consumed = true;
  }
}

I'm not satisfied that this simply works, I'd like to know if there's a better pattern (excluded, as said, making ObjectAConfig immutable by design from begin).

For example:

  • can make sense define a monad like Once<T> that allow the wrapped value to be initialized only once?

  • can make sense define a type that returns the type itself changing a private field?

share|improve this question
    
Why can't you implement an immutable type? It would've helped if you explained the real problem you're trying to solve. –  Dan Abramov Feb 26 '13 at 12:12
    
This Question has some interesting patterns doing similar things. –  James Barrass Feb 26 '13 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

What you are implementing sometimes goes under the name "popsicle immutability" - i.e. you can freeze it. Your current approach will work - indeed I use that pattern myself in numerous places.

You can probably reduce some duplication via something like:

private void SetField<T>(ref T field, T value) {
    if (Consumed) throw new InvalidOperationException();
    field = value;
}
public int ValueB {
    get { return _valueB; }
    set { SetField(ref _valueB, value); }
}    
public string ValueA {
    get { return _valueA; }
    set { SetField(ref _valueA, value); }
}

There is another related approach, though: a builder. For example, taking your existing class:

public interface IConfig
{
    string ValueA { get; }
    int ValueB { get; }
}
public class ObjectAConfig : IConfig
{
    private class ImmutableConfig : IConfig {
        private readonly string valueA;
        private readonly int valueB;
        public ImmutableConfig(string valueA, int valueB)
        {
            this.valueA = valueA;
            this.valueB = valueB;
        }
    }
    public IConfig Build()
    {
        return new ImmutableConfig(ValueA, ValueB);
    }
    ... snip: implementation of ObjectAConfig
}

Here there is a truly immutable implementation of IConfig, and your original implementation. If you want the frozen version, call Build().

share|improve this answer
    
+1 @Marc Gravell, I really appreciate samples; but I appreciate even more that this pattern as a name with a solid underlying concept. I'll also dive into E.Lippert articles. –  jay Feb 26 '13 at 12:29
    
For popsicle immunity to be thread-safe, all object setters and the freeze method must use locking or other such means to ensure that an object cannot be frozen while it is being modified [it may be possible to use interlocked primitives instead if one is willing to have improper thread usage trigger an exception in the freeze method]. Note that even if a class doesn't advertise itself as thread-safe, it should nonetheless assure that if an instance has reported itself as being immutable, and has reported any aspect of its state, that aspect will never thereafter change. –  supercat Mar 12 '13 at 17:47
    
@supercar in many cases it is reasonable to assume that something will be populated in an isolated area, frozen, and only then exposed to multiple threads. –  Marc Gravell Mar 12 '13 at 18:53
    
@MarcGravell: That would indeed be the normal usage pattern, but I would highly recommend that any code which endeavors to use popsicle immunity should be written in such a fashion that will uphold a guarantee of observational immutability even if that usage pattern is violated. By way of analogy, if two threads call StringBuilder.Append() and StringBuilder.ToString() simultaneously, the latter call should either throw an exception or return some arbitrary immutable sequence of characters. It should not [in .NET 2, does not] return a sequence of characters that Append is busy modifying. –  supercat Jun 13 '13 at 19:45
    
@MarcGravell: Among other things, such guarantees are important because code may assume that two immutable objects which are ever observed to be identical, will forevermore be identical and interchangeable. Code which discovers that it holds references to two distinct immutable objects whose content is identical may replace the reference to one object with a reference to the other. If an "immutable" object were to change, that could cause many unrelated objects to also change in weird, unpredictable, and undiagnosable fashion. –  supercat Jun 13 '13 at 19:48

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