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Since C++11 introduced the range-based for loop (range-based for in c++11), what is the neatest way to express looping over a range of integers?

Instead of

for (int i=0; i<n; ++i)

I'd like to write something like

for (int i : range(0,n))

Does the new standard support anything of that kind?

Update: this article describes how to implement a range generator in C++11: Generator in C++

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marked as duplicate by Nicol Bolas, Luc Touraille, Jay Gilford, Femaref, Stony Feb 26 '13 at 15:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Why do you want to loop over a range of integers in the first place? –  Xeo Feb 26 '13 at 12:27
1  
Boost.Range has irange. –  Cat Plus Plus Feb 26 '13 at 12:34
1  
@paxdiablo: C source is irrelevant. The question clearly explicitly pertains to C++11. –  Puppy Feb 26 '13 at 12:35
2  
@Xeo, I get you now. You have a good point except for one small use case (one I've discovered in many for/foreach questions). Sometimes you need to know the index. Granted that's probably a small use case but I can envisage a couple of things that might need it - just the other day, I had my boy doing a 12-times table program albeit not in C++ since I believe that would be cruel punishment for a 9yo :-) –  paxdiablo Feb 26 '13 at 12:37
1  
@Xeo: There have been many times when I've needed to loop over a range of integers, if for no other reason than to loop over a container and have access to the index at the same time. –  Nicol Bolas Feb 26 '13 at 12:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

While you can't do it with pure C++, you can do it with the help of boost:

#include <boost/range/irange.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace boost;
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    for(auto i : irange(1, 10))
        cout << i << "\n";
    return 0;
}

moreover, Boost.Range contains a few more interesting ranges which you could find pretty useful when using with new for loop. For example, with Boost.Range you can make reverse for loop.

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The neatest way is still this :

for (int i=0; i<n; ++i)

I guess you do this, but I wouldn't call it so neat :

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  for ( auto i : { 1,2,3,4,5 } )
  {
    std::cout<<i<<std::endl;
  }
}
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4  
I'm going to give +1 just for that first sentence. Sometimes the old ways are still the best :-) –  paxdiablo Feb 26 '13 at 12:25

Depending on what you have to do with the integer, consider the also the <numeric> header, in particular std::iota in conjunction with std::transform and std::fill depending on the cases.

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