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There are various different ways of implementing the singleton pattern in C#. I shall present them here in reverse order of elegance, starting with the most commonly seen, which is not thread-safe, and working up to a fully lazily-loaded, thread-safe, simple and highly performant version.

I am looking in google "how to implement singleton" and found a 3 way's ,which singleton implement are better C#?

1) This code use lock()

public class Singleton

{
    // Static object of the Singleton class. 
    private static volatile Singleton _instance = null;

    /// <summary>
    /// The static method to provide global access to the singleton object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Singleton object of class Singleton.</returns>
    public static Singleton Instance()
    {
        if (_instance == null)
        {
            lock (typeof(Singleton))
            {
                _instance = new Singleton();
            }
        }
        return _instance;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The constructor is defined private in nature to restrict access.
    /// </summary>
    private Singleton() { }

}  

2) This code is static init

/// <summary>
/// A sealed class providing access to it's ONLY readonly static instance.
/// </summary>
sealed class SingletonCounter 
{
    public static readonly SingletonCounter Instance = 
         new SingletonCounter();

    private SingletonCounter() {}
}

3) This code use Lazy type.

public sealed class Singleton
{
    private static readonly Lazy<Singleton> lazy =
        new Lazy<Singleton>(() => new Singleton());

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return lazy.Value; } }

    private Singleton()
    {
    }
} 
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closed as not a real question by duffymo, Stony, Konstantin D - Infragistics, Christoph, Stephen C Feb 26 '13 at 15:43

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
By the method you presented, the 3rd sounds good. Do you have to use Singletons though? Do you have unit testing in mind? –  rhughes Feb 26 '13 at 12:35
4  
    
You're not locking correctly on 1) –  Oskar Kjellin Feb 26 '13 at 12:35
1  
Also 1 should be double-checked; it isn't –  Marc Gravell Feb 26 '13 at 12:38
    
already discussed a lot stackoverflow.com/questions/12255810/… –  sundar Feb 26 '13 at 12:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unless there is an over-riding reason, you should go for "simple". Indeed, you've neatly demonstrated that with the more exotic patterns it is possible to mess them up (like in 1, which has at least 2 notable problems). So you should prefer 2 for the reason that it is obviously correct. It has the disadvantage that it isn't lazy, but since there are no other methods on the type the only useful thing you can do is get the instance, so that isn't a problem: there is never a situation that it would be useful for it to be lazy. It is also totally lock-free and there are no conditions to be evaluated to fetch the instance.

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is the Lasy(#3) is thread safe? –  user2068793 Feb 26 '13 at 12:48
1  
@user2068793 yes it is, but it is more complicated than it needs to be. With the class as shown, there is no utility whatsoever in it being Lazy<T> - it has overhead, and doesn't solve any problem. –  Marc Gravell Feb 26 '13 at 12:53

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