Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assume the following code:

[ContractClass(typeof(ICC4Contract))]
public interface ICC4
{
    bool IsFooSet { get; }
    string Foo { get; }
}

public class CC4 : ICC4
{
    private string _foo;

    public bool IsFooSet { get { return Foo != null; } }

    public string Foo { get { return _foo; } }
}

[ContractClassFor(typeof(ICC4))]
public abstract class ICC4Contract : ICC4
{
    public bool IsFooSet
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures((Contract.Result<bool>() && Foo != null)
                             || !Contract.Result<bool>());
            return false;
        }
    }

    public string Foo
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures((Contract.Result<string>() != null && IsFooSet)
                             || !IsFooSet);
            return null;
        }
    }
}

The contracts try to say:

  1. IsFooSet will return true if Foo is not null.
  2. Foo doesn't return null if IsFooSet returns true.

This almost works.
However, I get an "ensures unproven" on return _foo;, because the checker doesn't realize that Foo will always equal _foo.

Changing Foo to an automatic property with a private setter removes that warning, but I don't want to do that (I don't like automatic properties with private setters).

What do I have to change in the above code to make the warning go away while preserving the _foo field?

The following doesn't work:

  1. Changing IsFooSet to use _foo instead of Foo. It will result in an additional "ensures unproven" on IsFooSet.
  2. Adding an invariant Foo == _foo. This will result in an "invariant unproven" on the implicit, default constructor. Furthermore, on a real code-base the processing time of the static checker will be magnitudes higher.
  3. Adding Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<string>() == _foo); to the getter of Foo as per this answer doesn't change anything.
share|improve this question
1  
This won't help with your issue, but may I ask you why you don't like automatic properties with private setters? –  ken2k Feb 26 '13 at 13:32
1  
Most of the time, those properties are invariants of a class, i.e. the backing field should be made readonly. That's not possible with an automatic property. I actually try to completely avoid automatic properties. Reasons are outlined here. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 26 '13 at 13:35
    
Would it be removed if you set _foo to an empty string by default? It feels like the problem is more that the default value of _foo is going to be null. –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 26 '13 at 13:35
    
@MichaelPerrenoud: No, that doesn't change anything. Why should it? The default value of _foo has no impact on the defined contracts. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 26 '13 at 13:36
    
@DanielHilgarth, I was working off the assumption that the only reality the compiler would have is the default value of _foo which breaks the contract. –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 26 '13 at 13:38

1 Answer 1

You can use short-circuiting to simplify the condition, and that works for some reason:

[ContractClassFor(typeof(ICC4))]
public abstract class ICC4Contract : ICC4
{
    public bool IsFooSet
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(!Contract.Result<bool>() || Foo != null);
            return false;
        }
    }

    public string Foo
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(!IsFooSet || Contract.Result<string>() != null);
            return null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.