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How do I remove element from a list of tuple if the 2nd item in each tuple is a duplicate?

For example, I have a list sorted by 1st element that looks like this:

alist = [(0.7897897,'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.653234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.353234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.325345, 'this is not really a foo bar'),
(0.323234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),]

The desired output leave the tuple with the highest 1st item, should be:

alist = [(0.7897897,'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.325345, 'this is not really a foo bar')]
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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If your alist is already sorted by the first element from highest to lowest:

alist = [(0.7897897,'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.653234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.353234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),
(0.325345, 'this is not really a foo bar'),
(0.323234, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),]

seen = set()
out = []
for a,b in alist:
    if b not in seen:
        out.append((a,b))
        seen.add(b)

out is now:

[(0.7897897, 'this is a foo bar sentence'),
 (0.325345, 'this is not really a foo bar')]
share|improve this answer
    
+1. But it seems to me that alist might already be sorted. –  Junuxx Feb 26 '13 at 13:21
1  
@Junuxx I guess it's wise to infer that this list is incidentally sorted, but it is not guaranteed that everytime it will be sorted. –  heltonbiker Feb 26 '13 at 13:22
    
@Junuxx - you're right. The most interesting part has been done by OP. Then it is just a boring loop. –  eumiro Feb 26 '13 at 13:23
1  
@heltonbiker - the OP alrady has "I have a list sorted by 1st element" - I did not realize it first. –  eumiro Feb 26 '13 at 13:23
    
(well, actually the OP stated that the list is ALREADY sorted...) –  heltonbiker Feb 26 '13 at 13:23

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