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I find the C++ STL method of doing simple set operations quite clunky to use. For example, to find the difference between two sets:

std::set<int> newUserIds;
set_difference(currentUserIds.begin(), currentUserIds.end(), mPreviousUserIds.begin(), mPreviousUserIds.end(), std::inserter(newUserIds, newUserIds.end()));
std::set<int> missingUserIds;
set_difference(mPreviousUserIds.begin(), mPreviousUserIds.end(), currentUserIds.begin(), currentUserIds.end(), std::inserter(missingUserIds, missingUserIds.end()));
mPreviousUserIds = currentUserIds;

Does boost offer an alternative set of classes that would reduce the above example to something like this:

set_type<int> newUserIds = currentUserIds.difference(mPreviousUserIds);
set_type<int> missingUserIds = mPreviousUserIds.difference(currentUserIds);

(Similar to QSet in Qt which overrides operator- in this way.)

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3  
It's a five-finger exercise to write that if you want it. –  Pete Becker Feb 26 '13 at 14:02
    
It is but it leaves me with a personal base of code to import into any project where I need it, which isn't always possible (e.g. at work) and makes it harder for others to understand the code. –  Tim MB Feb 26 '13 at 14:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

See Boost Range Set algorithms. They still expect an output iterator though.

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Nope. But I here is how to clean it up.

First, rewrite iterator based functions as ranged based functions. This halves your boilerplate.

Second, have them return container builders rather than take insert iterators: this gives you efficient assignment syntax.

Third, and probably too far, write them as named operators.

The final result is you get:

set<int> s = a *intersect* b;
set<int> s2 = c -difference- s;
set<int> s3 = a *union* (b *intersect* s -difference- s2);

... after writing a boatload of boilerplate code elsewhere.

As far as I know, boost does step 1.

But each of the above three stages should reduce your boilerplate significantly.

Container builder:

template<typename Functor>
struct container_builder {
  Functor f;
  template<typename Container, typename=typename std::enable_if<back_insertable<Container>::value>::type>
  operator Container() const {
    Container retval;
    using std::back_inserter;
    f( back_inserter(retval) );
    return retval;
  }
  container_builder(Functor const& f_):f(f_) {}
};

which requires writing is_back_insertable (pretty standard SFINAE).

You wrap your ranged based (or iterator based) functor that takes a back_insert_iterator as the last argument, and use std::bind to bind the input parameters leaving the last one free. Then pass that to container_builder, and return it.

container_builder can then be implicitly cast to any container that accepts std::back_inserter (or has its own ADL back_inserter), and move semantics on every std container makes the construct-then-return quite efficient.

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12  
Whoa. Named operators. Mind. blown. Why have I never thought of this before? –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 26 '13 at 14:08
    
What the...? Now that is an interresting thing (even if more from a theoretical point of view, I guess, but who knows). –  Christian Rau Feb 26 '13 at 14:25
    
@KonradRudolph Here, have an implementation. make_infix<'*'>(arbitrary_binary_functor) returns a named operator on *. (everything below make_infix is various kinds of test code) –  Yakk Feb 26 '13 at 14:26
    
@Yakk The implementation was easy once you named the concept. … although I think I’d use <op> or %op% (the latter because it’s the syntax R uses). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 26 '13 at 15:01
2  
@KonradRudolph the precedence of a named operator in C++ is the same as the "surrounding" operators. %op% thus ties with other multiplication/division operators in precedence, and <op> is looser than anything except assignment, logical, and == type operations. v1 *dot* v2 + v3 follows expected precedence rules, as does v0 *dot* v1 <cmp> v2 *dot* v3. Given that any binary operator works, and it has meaning, I simply let the user choose -- so make_infix<'%','<>'>(func) gives you your syntax. A nice side effect is vec1 +append= vec2; syntax reads real pretty as well. –  Yakk Feb 26 '13 at 20:17

No and I think it never have something like that, this is a general principle in C++ that when you can have a non-member function to do the job never make that function a member. so it can't be like that, but may be Boost::Range help you.

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3  
I think OP’s beef wasn’t with the nonmember functions – the member function implementation was just an example. And there are trivial (and not so trivial) ways of making OP’s code way more concise with a proper library without having to use member function (Boost.Range does offer such a way, I believe). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 26 '13 at 13:38

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