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Lets say I have:

if (count <= instance.getFCount()) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= instance.getFSCount()) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= instance.getTCount()) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= instance.getOCount()) {
    //do something and return String
}

I am thinking how can I replace this code into something more object oriented. The problem is that if I would have statement like this:

if (count <= 0) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= 1) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= 2) {
    //do something and return String
} else if (count <= 3) {
    //do something and return String
}

I could replace it with some factory pattern or enum based approach because my values 0, 1, 2, 3 would always be static. For e.g. I would create a map to hold the class against the number, then if my count is 0 I would know that I need to create an instance from the class which was mapped with zero and so on.

But now I am thinking if there is any way to be done if I don't have the static values in if condition, because for e.g. what is returned to this: instance.getOCount() might be different depending on the configuration.

Could you give me some thoughts how to achieve this?

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4  
Polymorphism was born to eliminate switch and if/else chains. –  duffymo Feb 26 '13 at 13:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't think using patterns is the solution here...everything will be harder to read than your original code. But if you are sure, this is one option: Lets say your instance belongs to a class User. Create an interface

public interface IDynamicAction<T> {
boolean select(T t);
String action(T t);
}

Make a list

List<IDynamicAction<User>> actions = new ArrayList<IDynamicAction<User>>();
actions.add(new IDynamicAction<User>() {
@Override
public boolean select(User instance) {
    return count <= instance.getFSCount();
}

@Override
public String action(User t) {
    System.out.println("count <= instance.getFSCount()");
    return "count <= instance.getFSCount()";
}
});


actions.add(new IDynamicAction<User>() {
@Override
public boolean select(User instance) {
    return count <= instance.getTCount();
}
@Override
public String action(User t) {
    System.out.println("count <= instance.getTCount()");
    return " count <= instance.getTCount()";
}
});

actions.add(new IDynamicAction<User>() {
@Override
public boolean select(User instance) {
    return count <= instance.getOCount();
}
@Override
public String action(User t) {
    System.out.println("count <= instance.getOCount()");
    return " count <= instance.getOCount()";
}
});

And execute your code with

for(IDynamicAction<User> action : actions){
if(action.select(instance)){
    String s = action.action(instance);
    System.out.println(s);
    break;
}

}

Notice the break, I'm assuming based in your code only one action can execute If you don't need a return value you may use an abstract class instead of an interface and make the if(select) action(); a part of the AbstractDynamicAction class the code will be nicer

Java7 does not really help doing that kind of stuff. Closures would make this things easier on the eye...but IMHO, your original multiple IF is the way to go.

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That works for me, thanks :) –  user1759136 Feb 26 '13 at 15:48

When you have lots of different if else statements, you can employ a Strategy Pattern. This helps you create manageable code that conforms to the best practice.

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1  
+1: for Strategy (policy) pattern –  knowbody Feb 26 '13 at 13:50
    
How is it going to help with a chain of ifs that are not based on checking the instance??? –  dasblinkenlight Feb 26 '13 at 13:51
1  
@dasblinkenlight - exactly, thanks. Chris Cooney - Have you even read my question until the end? I could use strategy pattern in the second example which I gave. How can I use this if behind the if condition operator is the value which is not always the same? –  user1759136 Feb 26 '13 at 14:01
    
Remember to mark the correct answer for future readers. In this instance though, there is no ONE correct answer. It's data modelling and design; rather than mathematical development. :) –  christopher Feb 26 '13 at 14:02

I believe there's no need to replace such a simple logic with a design pattern, it's not justified. A switch would be an improvement (assuming count is an integer), but why create a bunch of classes? it'd be justified only if each one had additional, different behavior.

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switch doesn't work with runtime values, as OP requested. –  Marko Topolnik Feb 26 '13 at 13:57
    
@MarkoTopolnik the states that currently the values are static, for that a switch might work (we don't know if count is an integer). For the "what-if" scenario of dynamic values, you're right. –  Óscar López Feb 26 '13 at 14:01

If you use a NavigableMap such as a TreeMap, the keys being your thresholds and values being Callables, you'll be able to retrieve the appropriate Callable and invoke it, all in a one-liner. The relevant method is NavigableMap#ceilingEntry.

final NavigableMap<Integer, Callable<String>> strats = new TreeMap<>();

...

return strats.ceilingEntry(val).getValue().call(args);
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