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i have two strings:

my $wTime = "00:00-06:00 / 06:00-09:00 / 09:00-17:00 / 17:00-23:00 / 23:00-00:00";
my $wTemp = "17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C";

I would like to join these strings to a hash, where the first part of each timescale is a key, e.g.:

$hash = (
  "00:00" => "17.0 °C",
  "06:00" => "21.0 °C",
  "09:00" => "17.0 °C",
  "17:00" => "21.0 °C",
  "23:00" => "17.0 °C"
);

I have tried some variants of map and split but i've got some mysterious results ;-)

%hash = map {split /\s*\/\s*/, $_ } split /-/, $wTime;
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1  
Welcome to SO. This is a good first question. It would be better if you would show some of these map and split things you've tried. You can only learn from your mistakes if people can point them out. ;-) –  simbabque Feb 26 '13 at 14:00
    
as i told before: i've tried to split $wTime with e.g. %hash = map {split /\s*\/\s*/, $_ } split /-/, $wTime; but this split every timestring into a key. there are some other variants i've tried also. –  user2111402 Feb 26 '13 at 14:05
1  
I took the liberty to add this to your question. You can also edit your question yourself. –  simbabque Feb 26 '13 at 14:09

4 Answers 4

You can use List::MoreUtils zip / mesh function:

my @time_ranges = split ' / ', $wTime;
my @times = map { (split '-', $_)[0] } @time_ranges;
my @temps = split ' / ', $wTemp;

use List::MoreUtils qw(zip);
my %hash = zip @times, @temps;
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thanks for your reply. I've forgotten: without any other module. –  user2111402 Feb 26 '13 at 13:59

One more way:

my $wTime = "00:00-06:00 / 06:00-09:00 / 09:00-17:00 / 17:00-23:00 / 23:00-00:00";
my $wTemp = "17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C";

my %h1;
@h1{$wTime=~/([\d:]+)-/g}=split(m! / !,$wTemp);
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What a pity you can't make it in one line (i.e. statement) ;) –  Xaerxess Feb 26 '13 at 15:02
2  
@Xaerxess, Sure you can. my %h1 = do { my %h; @h{...}=...; %h };. There are ways without using do or ;. –  ikegami Feb 27 '13 at 2:24
    
Yeah, I use do sometimes ;) Never underestimate Perl's powers of putting everything in one line... –  Xaerxess Feb 27 '13 at 10:21

Here's a verbose solution without List::MoreUtils.

my $wTime = "00:00-06:00 / 06:00-09:00 / 09:00-17:00 / 17:00-23:00 / 23:00-00:00";
my $wTemp = "17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C / 21.0 °C / 17.0 °C";

my @time = map { (split /-/, $_)[0] } split m! / !, $wTime;
my @temp = split m! / !, $wTemp;

my %hash;
for (my $i=0; $i <= $#time; $i++) { # Iterate the times via their index...
  # This only works if we have an equal number of temps and times of course.
  $hash{$time[$i]} = $temp[$i];
}
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this works, but not completely! :-) the last timescale 23:00-00:00 is ignored. –  user2111402 Feb 26 '13 at 14:14
3  
<$#time in the for loop should be either <=$#time or <@time –  TLP Feb 26 '13 at 14:19
    
Bingo... :-) i overlooked this! thanks! –  user2111402 Feb 26 '13 at 14:24
    
@TLP thanks, corrected it. –  simbabque Feb 26 '13 at 15:18
2  
You might also consider @hash{@time} = @temp, using a hash slice assignment. –  TLP Feb 26 '13 at 15:25

Create both lists.

my @wTimes = map /([^-]+)/, split qr{ / }, $wTime;
my @wTemps = split qr{ / }, $wTemp;

Then use a hash slice.

my %hash;
@hash{@wTimes} = @wTemps;
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