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So I'm fairly new to MVVM and I have been struggling with a few issues regarding user input validation. WPF has some built-in features that seem to work like "magic", and generally, I know "magic" is not good.

For Example: If you bind a TextBox to a Property that has a type of double and the user enters "hello" into that TextBox, WPF automatically displays a red border around the TextBox notifying the user that the input is invalid.

This is all well and good, but it does seem like "magic". I was told by an experienced developer that WPF and app builders that are similar want to have too much control. He said that in web development the View would not know what type the Property is. Which makes sense to me. So this leads me to my general question - Should a WPF View understand property types? - If instead I declared the Property type as a string I could then have complete control over the view. Instead of having to work around WPF's "smart" TextBox "magic".

An alternative way to phrase my question is - Should Property types be declared in the Model or ViewModel?

I understand that if you declare the Property type in the Model as a double and as a string in the ViewModel it must be parsed in the Model. In most examples of MVVM applications I have looked at, the Property types are similar across the entire application, but I think that a "dumb" view that doesn't understand what it is working with would be much better.

Back to my example: If the Property were declared as a String you could completely control the format necessary for input and prevent invalid input all-together. This seems like a much better solution than trusting the WPF TextBox.

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When you bind a TextBox to a double and type in a string like "hello", I think what actually occurs is that WPF tries to set your double value to a string value, and that throws an exception. That exception is what causes the red border to appear around the TextBox and an error message to display, not any special handling. You could just as easily throw an exception in the setter for your double property, and the same thing would occur. I wouldn't really call that "magic", just exception handling :) –  Rachel Feb 26 '13 at 14:34
    
@Rachel I would agree, but why not just completely control the input yourself? Yes, you can somewhat control it when the type is double but not nearly as well as if it was a string. You could create an application that is practically impossible to break. I just think that the View should be kind of dumb! –  Jordan Carroll Feb 26 '13 at 14:39
    
I'm not sure why you'd want an extra layer for that. WPF has two layers: a data layer and a UI layer. The data layer should represent your data. If you have a number, it should be of a numeric data type, not a string data type. The UI layer is meant to be a user-friendly interface for the data, so you might do something like display your numeric value using a TextBox so the end user can easily edit it. If you force your data layer to use a string instead of a number because you are using a TextBox, then you are letting the UI control your application, which is not how WPF should work. –  Rachel Feb 26 '13 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, I think that feature of WPF is "that nice" :)

WPF has two layers: a data layer and a UI layer.

The data layer contains your data. If you have a number in your data, it should be of a numeric data type, not a string data type.

The UI layer (XAML) is only meant to provide a user-friendly interface for the data so that users can easily interact with the data layer. For example, if you have a data layer containing a numeric value and you want the user to be able to edit that value, you might choose to display your number using a TextBox.

If you force your data layer to use a string instead of a number just because the UI layer is using a TextBox to display the data, then you are letting the UI control your application, which is not how WPF should work. In addition, blending the two layers together like this makes it much harder to maintain in the future. For example, what happens if you decide to change the TextBox to a NumericUpDown UI control? Now you have to go modify your data layer to make a UI change.

In regards to your particular example, when you bind a TextBox to a double and type in a string like "hello", what actually occurs is that WPF tries to set your double value to a string value, and that throws an exception.

That exception is what causes the red border to appear around the TextBox and an error message to display, not any special handling. You could just as easily throw an exception in the setter for your double property, and the same thing would occur.

I wouldn't really call that "magic", just exception handling :)

But to avoid having to throw exceptions anytime you want to validate input, WPF provides the IDataErrorInfo interface which you can use to validate your property without throwing exceptions. The UI will react to errors raised with this interface the same way it would react to Exceptions.

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So, do you think it would be better to simply notify the user of an error in the TextBox or prevent them from making one? I was leaning towards completely preventing them from making an error, and with your solution it doesn't seem like that is possible. Because if you just throw an exception or notify the user with Error Info, the user still has to do something to change. Which I'm ok with doing, I have just been under the impression that complete control would be better because it would create a situation where errors are not possible. I'm trying to grasp the concept, so just bare with me. –  Jordan Carroll Feb 26 '13 at 15:07
    
@JordanCarroll The important part is that you keep your UI layer and your data layer separate. If you want to prevent a user from entering non-numeric characters in a TextBox, you can do that fairly easily within the UI layer, such as attaching an event to OnKeyDown on OnTextInput to prevent the text change if the user is entering non-numeric data. But that kind of UI-specific validation should be done in the UI layer, while data-specific validation (for example, number can't be below 0) should occur in the data layer. –  Rachel Feb 26 '13 at 15:10
    
I agree with that. I was having another issue though. Because the TextBox wants the input to be a double it deems certain characters insignificant, which makes validation difficult. For example: if I have a TextBox bound to a double then the first decimal point is deemed insignifican. So in the code-behind when I attempt to validate the text, if the user has entered "123.", the TextBox.Text Property annoyingly only returns "123" (without the "."). So therefore, I cannot completely control user input in this situation. –  Jordan Carroll Feb 26 '13 at 15:18
    
@JordanCarroll Perhaps what you're looking for is the StringFormat property of the binding to format it. For example, {Binding SomeDouble, StringFormat=D2} will format your double value as a decimal with 2 digits to the right of the decimal point. You can find other common formats here. But if you want your TextBox to display exactly what the user typed in, such as "123.", then you would probably be better off with a string data type instead of a number as numbers are, well, numbers, and not strings :) –  Rachel Feb 26 '13 at 15:25
    
I'm sorry for going in circles, but the TextBox does display exactly what the user types. BUT it does not return the same value that it displays. Thanks for all of your help by the way! Like I said, if the user typed "123." the textbox will display that value, but programmatically calling the textbox value returns only "123". –  Jordan Carroll Feb 26 '13 at 15:33

Yes it should.

Karl Shifflett has a great article about it. Input Validation – UI Exceptions & Model Validation Errors

The solution is to detect invalid input. Data binding pipeline will throw exception when user input invalid data type. When it happens handle it on View then add error messages on ViewModel so that you could use it when needed.

WPF by default swallow that data binding exception, but you could add a handler on Loaded event in your View class.

_errorEventRoutedEventHandler = new RoutedEventHandler(ExceptionValidationErrorHandler);
this.AddHandler(System.Windows.Controls.Validation.ErrorEvent, _errorEventRoutedEventHandler, true);

Implement the handler

private void ExceptionValidationErrorHandler(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    // Add logic to handle this invalid data type exception. 
    // Add error messages to viewmodel, show notification dialog, etc
    ...
}

Set these properties on XAML binding NotifyOnValidationError, ValidatesOnDataErrors, ValidatesOnExceptions to true.

Text="{Binding UnitPrice, StringFormat=c, NotifyOnValidationError=True, ValidatesOnDataErrors=True, ValidatesOnExceptions=True}"

That's it.

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Since you´re using a strong typed language, you're going to need validation sooner or later. I'm not sure what you would want to achieve by not using a form of validation that is already at hand. Don't forget that you can modify your view to do what ever you want when an invalid input is given. If you don't want any exceptions thrown (as explained by @Rachel), using a string property will likely prevent them.

Declaration

Properties connected to your database are declared in the Model. Properties you need to transform the Model into something userfriendly, are declared in the ViewModel. For example, we have a value (valueA) that is stored in the database. valueA is calculated by using two inputfields the user has available (valueB and valueC). In this case valueA is declared in your Model, but valueB and valueC are only declared in your ViewModel, since they don't need to be stored in the database. (Technically all three are available in your ViewModel but only valueA is declared in your Model)

The way I understand it:

  • Model Has properties that are stored in the database
  • ViewModel Converts the Model to something a user can handle (and vice versa).
  • View Is more or less the 'input area for your ViewModel' in which the user is aided by the use of graphics.
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