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I have no idea what is causing this error. Me and my teacher went over it and can't find what was wrong.

import java.util.Scanner;
public class MailAssignment
{
public static void main(String [] args){

    Scanner userinput = new Scanner(System.in);
    char p;
    char f;
    double price = 0;
    System.out.println("First class or priority?");
    char type = userinput.next().charAt(0);
    System.out.println("How much does the package weigh? (in ounces)");
    double weight = userinput.nextDouble();

    switch (type){
     case p:
     if (weight > 16)
        price = weight * 3.95;

        else if (weight > 32) 
            price = (1.20 * (weight / 16));
       else
            price = 3.50 * weight;


        break;


     case f: 
     if (weight < 1 )
     price = 0.34;

     else if ( weight > 1)
     price = 0.34 + (weight * 21);

     else if (weight > 13)
     price = weight * 3.95;

        else if (weight > 32) 
            price = 1.20 * (weight / 16);
        else
            price = 3.50 * weight;

            break;

        }     

    System.out.println("Your price is: " +price);
    }
}

It throws a "Constant expression required" error when it's compiled and it points to the case p: line, however, it also throws it for f: if I switch them so I must be doing something completely off.

share|improve this question
1  
You can't use variables in case statements, that are not declared final. –  Till Helge Feb 26 '13 at 14:13
    
I was trying something similar, and it turns out that even if the variable is final, the same error will be thrown. –  Chthonic Project Dec 25 '13 at 23:56

3 Answers 3

Yes, a case expression has to be a constant (or an enum constant name) - you can't use a variable. See the Java Language Specification section 14.11 (switch statements) for more details. (You hadn't even initialized the variables, so it's not clear what you expected to happen, to be honest.)

Did you mean:

case 'p':
    ...

case 'f':
    ...

? This will match your input (type) against the character literals 'p' and 'f'.

(As an aside, if this stumped your teacher, I have concerns about how suitable they are to be teaching Java. This is reasonably basic stuff.)

share|improve this answer
    
or to clarify, the case is for the VALUE of the variable, not the name of it, so the case is if the value of the variable type = 'p' do this, if it's 'f' do that –  Jeff Hawthorne Feb 26 '13 at 14:17
    
@JeffHawthorne: The value of which variable? If it's type you mean, then clearly its name is type rather than p for example. In short, I'm not sure your comment actually makes anything clearer... –  Jon Skeet Feb 26 '13 at 14:48
    
i was trying to get away from the word constant, literal is a better word, but since "type" is a variable, and we're checking the value of type, i thought constant might confuse things –  Jeff Hawthorne Feb 26 '13 at 14:54

You can't use a variable in your case statement, it has to be a literal char (e.g. 'p', 'f').

share|improve this answer

In case statement
You should use a (character switch) or a (number switch) only
For example
You can use a (character switch)

switch (type) {
case 'p':
.......
case 'f':
......
}

NOT

switch (type) {
case p:
.......
case f:
......
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well no if you want things to be fast you should use constants to avoid magic numbers and integers to benefit from faster comparison. Java just fails to provide a reasonable method other than the enum workround for doing this. –  Keith Brings Nov 10 at 10:25

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