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When reading C code, I often come across statements such as:

int rc = foo(bar, baz);
assert(rc != NULL);

where the variable rc is used for checking the return value of the function. I assume it's a mnemonic of some sort but can't deduce its meaning.

I would like to know its meaning to help with my understanding of the code.

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closed as not constructive by Mike, Kev Feb 26 '13 at 16:17

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Me, I'm boring and name the variable "result" instead of guess-the-acronym. –  Lundin Feb 26 '13 at 14:45
2  
You don't need to understand the naming of variables to understand code. You need to understand what the function foo() is, does, and returns to understand this code. Never trust what the return variable is named to explain what the code does... –  Mike Feb 26 '13 at 14:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think it's "return code". Mostly used to refer to integer return codes of 0/NULL or 1 form.

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rc stands for "rutabaga casserole". What? You don't think so?!

Well the fact is no one can say what this really stands for because there are no mandated names in C code. It could stand for "return code" or "remote control" or whatever the author had in his head at the time.

I would like to know it's meaning to help with my understanding of the code

Your argument is inherently flawed. If you want to understand code better, make sure you read the documentation and source of the functions being used, never trust that the names of functions, or data types yield any precedence into what the code is actually doing.


Edit to address the comment:

Actually, I think your argument is flawed, Mike. It is absurd to say that knowing commonly used variable names won't help you understand code, despite the fact that they are not mandated. For example, it is well known that i is commonly used (but not mandated) as a loop increment variable across all languages.

It's a fair argument to say that there are indeed variable names that people tend to follow. We'll see ret or rc for a return value or a return code, frequently we'll see single variables a,b,c,...,i,j,k, used for looping operators. However making an assumption about what a variable does based on a name is a terrible idea.
Not only might your assumption about what the variable stands for be wrong (for example a simple i in an Ohm's law function might very well be the name chosen to represent current, nothing to do with looping) but also what makes sense to you might not be what made sense to the author.

example, the author has a variable int return_code. You might assume that's going to house the return code of the function, but maybe it's being used to check the returned value of a function called within the function you're evaluating and the variable int r is used for the return code instead.
Let's say you see the variable count is that going to be a loop iterator, or a count of a number of files, or is it a counting semaphore?

So, Chris Redford, I must respectfully disagree. It's not absurd to say that knowing commonly used variable names won't help understand code, because it won't do any better than reading the code itself, and it might lead you down a stray path thinking you know what is going on when you really don't.
If you understand source code you'll see return xxx; or for(int yyy=0; and you won't have to make assumptions about what those variables are doing, you'll know for sure, and that's the only way to be guaranteed you know what's happening.

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Very good point! –  favoretti Feb 26 '13 at 20:00
    
Point taken. Only that I've seen it in code from different authors so I assumed it's some sort of convention. Plus I know it is good practice to use meaningful variable names to make code more understandable. So I don't think my argument is flawed. –  krm Feb 27 '13 at 8:44
    
Actually, I think your argument is flawed, Mike. It is absurd to say that knowing commonly used variable names won't help you understand code, despite the fact that they are not mandated. For example, it is well known that i is commonly used (but not mandated) as a loop increment variable across all languages. After learning the usage of i in one language or application, you can readily recognize its use in another language or application and more rapidly understand the code. –  Chris Redford Jan 28 '14 at 19:52
    
@Chris - The question was closed for this exact reason, it solicits debate. I edited my answer to address your response perhaps it will change your view, but at this point it's really just your opinion against mine. My experiences tell me do not trust variable names, I've seen that time and again, so that is my stance. –  Mike Jan 29 '14 at 18:06

I would guess "result code", but it's just a guess of course.

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1  
Result code or return code. –  Joe Feb 26 '13 at 14:25

It often means "return code" or "result code", although it could basically mean anything depending on what the author intended. As naming conventions go, it's not that great. I mean, it's better than myVariable, but not by a whole lot.

I subscribe to the idea that variable names should be meaningful, and rc isn't terribly meaningful. If it means "result code", then my question is "result of what?" What does the return code designate?

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