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I have an Enum with around 70 fields.

I want 10 of them to be displayed in a particular order, then I want the rest to be displayed alphabetically using a Comparator. I have tried many things, but I can't get it to work.

Here is a sample enum with reduces attributes I want Picard, Worf and William to display first, then the rest alphabetically

I cannot use any third libraries. It must be java core. So if you want to provide guava answers, or apache commons answer, please do so in addition to java core.

public enum StarTrek {

    JeanLucPicard("Picard"),
    GeordiLaForge("Geordi"),
    DiannaTroi("Dianna"),
    Worf("Worf"),
    WilliamRiker("William"),
    Q("Q");

    private String label;

    StarTrek(String label) { this.label = label; }

    @Override public String toString() { return label; }
}

    List<StarTrek> specificOrder = Arrays.asList(StarTrek.JeanLucPicard, StarTrek.Worf, StarTrek.WilliamRiker);

    Comparator<StarTrek> comp = new Comparator<StarTrek>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(StarTrek o1, StarTrek o2) {
                //TODO: loop through the specific order, and display those first, then for the rest, go alphabetic
                return 0;
            }
    };

    List<StarTrek> all = Arrays.asList(StarTrek.values());
    Collections.sort(all, comp);
share|improve this question
1  
Why not do it in two steps ? – Christophe Roussy Feb 26 '13 at 14:36
    
I have solved it by not using sort, and just removing and adding in the collection, but I want to solve it using sort. its much nicer. I also only want to call sort once – Shervin Asgari Feb 26 '13 at 14:40
    
I'm not so sure it's nicer. Two steps would be more readable to me and stops you from polluting your enum class with meta data required only for display. – Duncan Feb 26 '13 at 14:44
    
In that case do as others suggested. – Christophe Roussy Feb 26 '13 at 14:46
up vote 10 down vote accepted

It is bad design to place additional data in your enum just for the purposes of displaying in a particular order. Instead, place all that logic in your Comparator, as shown below:

public class StarTrekSorter implements Comparator<StarTrek> {

  private static final List<StarTrek> ORDERED_ENTRIES = Arrays.asList(
      StarTrek.JeanLucPicard, StarTrek.Worf, StarTrek.WilliamRiker);

  @Override
  public int compare(StarTrek o1, StarTrek o2) {
    if (ORDERED_ENTRIES.contains(o1) && ORDERED_ENTRIES.contains(o2)) {
      // Both objects are in our ordered list. Compare them by
      // their position in the list
      return ORDERED_ENTRIES.indexOf(o1) - ORDERED_ENTRIES.indexOf(o2);
    }

    if (ORDERED_ENTRIES.contains(o1)) {
      // o1 is in the ordered list, but o2 isn't. o1 is smaller (i.e. first)
      return -1;
    }

    if (ORDERED_ENTRIES.contains(o2)) {
      // o2 is in the ordered list, but o1 isn't. o2 is smaller (i.e. first)
      return 1;
    }

    return o1.toString().compareTo(o2.toString());
  }
}

Now, you can just sort:

public static void main(String[] args) {

  List<StarTrek> cast = Arrays.asList(StarTrek.values());

  Collections.sort(cast, new StarTrekSorter());

  for (StarTrek trek : cast) {
    System.out.println(trek);
  }  
}

which prints

Picard
Worf
William
Dianna
Geordi
Q
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 I like this answer. You are right about the design issue. – user714965 Feb 26 '13 at 15:02
    
Could you please explain step by step what is going on? Its hard to understand this comparator – Shervin Asgari Feb 26 '13 at 15:16
    
@Shervin I've added some comments to try and help. compare methods are always difficult to wrap your head around. – Duncan Feb 26 '13 at 20:24
    
@DuncanJones Thanks. It helped. Still find it quite difficult though :) – Shervin Asgari Feb 27 '13 at 7:54
    
@Shervin I found it difficult to write! The Javadocs for compare are not the easiest to read. Sometimes it's easiest to just experiment with a small set of values to be sure the ordering is as you expect. – Duncan Feb 27 '13 at 7:55

I would do it like this:

JeanLucPicard("Picard", 0),
GeordiLaForge("Geordi"),
DiannaTroi("Dianna"),
Worf("Worf", 1),
WilliamRiker("William", 2),
Q("Q");

StarTrek(String label) { this(label, -1); }
StarTrek(String label, int orderHint) { this.label=label; this.orderHint=orderHint; }

And in the compare method something like this:

if (orderHint == -1) {
   return o1.label.compareTo(o2.label));
}
return o2.orderHint-o1.orderHint;
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't there any other way other than changing my enum implementation? – Shervin Asgari Feb 26 '13 at 14:51
    
@Shervin, yup, check my answer. – Duncan Feb 26 '13 at 14:55

List the enums you want special ordering for first in your list, then use this code:

Comparator<StarTrek> comp = new Comparator<StarTrek>() {
    public int compare(StarTrek o1, StarTrek o2) {
        if (o1.ordinal() < 3)
            return o2.ordinal() < 3 ? o1.ordinal() - o2.ordinal() : 1;
        return o2.ordinal() < 3 ? -1 : o1.name().compareTo(o2.name());
    }
};
share|improve this answer

You could define an additional constructor in your enum, that takes an index parameter, then provide indexes for the instances you want to go first (leave the ones you want to go in alphabetical order unindexed):

enum StarTrek {

    JeanLucPicard("Picard"),
    GeordiLaForge("Geordi"),
    DiannaTroi("Dianna"),
    Worf("Worf", 2),
    WilliamRiker("William", 1),
    Q("Q");

    private final String label;
    private final Integer index;

    StarTrek(final String label, final Integer index ) { this.label = label; this.index = index; }

    StarTrek(final String label) { this.label = label; this.index = Integer.MAX_VALUE; }

    @Override public String toString() { return label; }

    public Integer getIndex() {
        return index;
    }
}

Then your comparator would have to look like:

final Comparator<StarTrek> comp = new Comparator<StarTrek>() {
                @Override
                public int compare(final StarTrek o1, final StarTrek o2) {
                    if (!o1.getIndex().equals(o2.getIndex())) {
                        return o1.getIndex().compareTo(o2.getIndex());
                    }
                    return o1.toString().compareTo(o2.toString());
                }
        };
share|improve this answer

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