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I am trying to embed an ID into an email so that when a recipient replies to an email that my system sends out, my system can pick it up and match the two together.

I have tried appending a custom header, however this is stripped out when the user replies.

I have tried embedding an HTML comment within the email, but outlook does not seem to keep comments when a reply email is created.

Worst case scenario, I can manually try and match the sent and received emails by time span or have a visible tag within the message body.

Does anyone know of a more elegant solution?

Thanks in advance

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Email messages already contain such an identifiers, called Message-ID. And there's even a way to send which message you're replying to by sending that ID in a header called In-Reply-To. That's done by pretty much all email clients, that's how they usually do their threading.

It's defined in RFC 822 (yep that's pretty old) and probably re-defined and refined in more modern versions of that.

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Perfect, works like a charm! I would never have found that! –  David Kiff Oct 2 '09 at 12:49
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Current spec is RFC 5322. Pertinent section is tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5322#section-3.6.4 –  james.garriss Nov 6 '12 at 16:10
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I have seen a method that includes a one byte image with a unique name that's linked to the user. When they view the email and download the images, your HTTP server will record a hit for that unique image. Of course the user needs to display images, but you can include a message in the body asking them to display the images. We actually include content in an image so they need to show images.

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If your incoming e-mail can handle +foo or -foo suffixes, use that.

Many e-mail systems can route user+foo@example.com or user-foo@example.com to user@example.com. You can replace foo with some kind of identifier.

Several mailing list servers use this for tracking bounces.

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I have just tried on exchange and lavabit.com, nether seem to support that! Thanks for the suggestion though. –  David Kiff Oct 2 '09 at 12:32
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While I can't say for certain, my investigation in that sort of matter some time ago yielded the following "conclusion":

  1. Headers are transformed a lot
  2. Message bodies are transformed a lot

This is partly because, I suspect, of:

  1. Need to protect users from malicious intentions
  2. Need to perform "targeted marketing"

I have seen "unique codes" flying around in clear text in the email body but I would suggest having a unique identifier embedded in the return address instead.

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The usual approach is to place the id in the subject line and/or somewhere visible in the message text and informing the recipient that he should not modify the subject or quote the original mail when responding.

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I have already suggested that in my question! –  David Kiff Oct 2 '09 at 12:34
    
And I responded that that is how it's usually done. –  jarnbjo Oct 2 '09 at 13:01
    
Sounds brittle. –  james.garriss Nov 6 '12 at 16:11
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