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I have a list [2 3 5] which I want to use to remove items from another list like [1 2 3 4 5], so that I get [1 4].

thanks

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1  
[] denotes vector not a list –  Roskoto Oct 2 '09 at 19:28

4 Answers 4

Try this:

(let [a [1 2 3 4 5]
      b [2 3 5]]
  (remove (set b) a))

which returns (1 4).

The remove function, by the way, takes a predicate and a collection, and returns a sequence of the elements that don't satisfy the predicate (a set, in this example).

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1  
... which is O(n + m) –  Thumbnail Apr 23 '14 at 9:31
user=> (use 'clojure.set)
nil
user=> (difference (set [1 2 3 4 5]) (set [2 3 5]))
#{1 4}

Reference:

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Is there something wrong with this solution? –  Ionuț G. Stan Oct 2 '09 at 13:31
2  
A vector is not a set. The ordering of the vector is not preserved when you convert it to a set. If I understands the question correctly, (difference (set [9 2 3 4 5]) (set [2 3 5])) returns #{4 9} when it should return [9 4] and (difference (set [1 1 2 3 4 5]) (set [2 3 5])) should return [1 1 4] and not #{1 4} If he wanted set semantics he probably would have used a set to begin with. –  Jonas Oct 3 '09 at 5:40
    
Thanks, Jonas. You're probably right about him not wanting set semantics. –  Ionuț G. Stan Oct 3 '09 at 14:07

Here is my take without using sets;

(defn my-diff-func [X Y] 
   (reduce #(remove (fn [x] (= x %2)) %1) X Y ))
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You can do this yourself with something like:

(def a [2 3 5])
(def b [1 2 3 4 5])

(defn seq-contains? 
  [coll target] (some #(= target %) coll))

(filter #(not (seq-contains? a %)) b)
; (3 4 5)

A version based on the reducers library could be:

(require '[clojure.core.reducers :as r])

(defn seq-contains? 
 [coll target] 
   (some #(= target %) coll))

(defn my-remove
"remove values from seq b that are present in seq a"
 [a b]
 (into [] (r/filter #(not (seq-contains? b %)) a)))

(my-remove [1 2 3 4 5] [2 3 5] )
; [1 4]

EDIT Added seq-contains? code

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1  
Hi Nicolas, I may be missing a point but, AFAIK contains? does not really check "content" rather it checks the index, check out this example; (contains? [7 2 3 4 5 6] 6) ;;false, there is no element at index 6, although there is an element 6. –  devrimbaris Jan 8 at 23:47
    
Thank you for the pointer. I totally forgot. Added the code for a seq-contains? function. –  Nicolas Modrzyk Jan 9 at 1:42

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