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I'm all newbie to programming, so please help me out. It seems that result variable doesn't have a correct value. I know it's better to use cin and cout but my tutor has asked me to use printf and scanf.

if I change the code to printf("%d", result); I wil get: Run-Time Check Failure #3 - The variable 'result' is being used without being initialized. and if i change the code to scanf("%c", &c); %c will get white space from the first scanf()!!! so i have to write it this way scanf("%c%*c", &c); or this way scanf(" %c", &c);. it seems that %c in contrast to %d or %f does not skip white space.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

int main    ()
{
    int n1, n2;
    int result; 
    char c;
    printf("Lotfan addad aval ra vared konid\n");
    scanf("%d", &n1);
    printf("Lotfan addad Dovom ra vared konid\n");
    scanf("%d", &n2);
    printf("Please choose an operator\n");
    scanf("%c%*c", &c);
    if (c=='+')
    {
        result=n1+n2;
    }
    else if (c=='-')
    {
        result=n1-n2;
    }
    else if (c=='*')
    {
        result=n1*n2;
    }
    else if (c=='/')
    {
        result=n1/n2;
    }
    //else 
    //{
        //printf("error");
    //}
    //printf("%d%c%d=%d" ,n1,c,n2,&result);
    printf("%d", &result);
    getch();
    return 0;
}
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Is this C or C++? Looking at your code, (other than the incorrect declaration of main) one would assume it is C. Which language are you learning? They are different. –  William Pursell Feb 26 '13 at 15:00
    
@WilliamPursell I think the difference deosn't make any sense here. –  MD.Unicorn Feb 26 '13 at 15:03
    
your tutor's advice is bad, typesafe C++ streams are preferred. If you must use printf though, add some for diagnostics of program flow and then take them out once it's working. Or learn how to step thru the code in debugger (extra credit) –  Steve Townsend Feb 26 '13 at 15:03
    
No, the difference here is not important to the question, but the learner has a tutor who is having him write C code instead of C++, and the student should be aware of that fact. –  William Pursell Feb 26 '13 at 15:04
    
i'm suppose to learn c++ not c. but the problem is my tutor ages as much as master yoda!!! –  user2111549 Feb 26 '13 at 16:15
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4 Answers

You don't always initialize result. If none of your if conditions evaluate to true, then it will be uninitialized. You'll need to make sure that you always initialize it.

What's more you must not pass &result to printf since that will print the address of result which I am sure is not what you desire. Pass result instead.

printf("%d", result);

When you wrote:

scanf("%c%*c", &c);

I presume that you in fact meant:

scanf("%c", &c);
share|improve this answer
    
if I change the code to printf("%d", result); I wil get: printf("%d", result); and if i change the code to scanf("%c", &c); %c will get white space from the first scanf()!!! so i have to write it this way scanf("%c%*c", &c); or this way scanf(" %c", &c);. it seems that %c in contrast to %d or %f does not skip white space. –  user2111549 Feb 26 '13 at 16:05
    
I don't want to enter into a debugging exercise where I help you take your program to completion. You asked about result and I answered that. –  David Heffernan Feb 26 '13 at 16:12
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You have:

scanf("%c%*c", &c);

Change it to:

scanf("%c", &c);

And you have:

printf("%d", &result);

Change it to:

printf("%d", result);
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Using printf("%d", &result); will always produce something strange! –  bash.d Feb 26 '13 at 15:02
    
@bash.d It is not strange. It is the address of the result varialbe in memory. –  MD.Unicorn Feb 26 '13 at 15:04
    
Yes, I know, it is just when you are expecting 10 or 3, and get 342643894 instead! I was just emphasizing... –  bash.d Feb 26 '13 at 15:06
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result value actually contains garbage value when it is not initialized properly. Hence, garbage in - garbage out!

Also this ->printf("%d", &result); should be printf("%d",result);

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how should i initialize it properly?? –  user2111549 Feb 26 '13 at 16:11
    
@user2111549 However you like. At the moment you don't initialize it at all in some cases. I explained this in the first paragraph of my answer. –  David Heffernan Feb 26 '13 at 16:52
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initialize result and change printf("%d", &result); to printf("%d", result);

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