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If I don't specify a partition key and thus perform a scan of all partitions, do the scans automatically take place in parallel with each partition scanned concurrently?

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The scan is done sequentially starting from the 1st Partition as entities are stored by PartitionKey/RowKey combination.

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Gaurav Mantri is correct.

If you want to force it to be done in parallel, you'll have to filter by all possible PartitionKeys and then perform those queries in parallel yourself in code. This may or may not be "better" (faster/easier/cheaper) as it will depend on quite a few different things.

Ultimately, I wouldn't advise this for the typical situation. It's probably better that you organize your data differently.

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Thanks for your response. The way I see it, the point of shards is to be able to run embarrassingly parallel queries over many shorter data-sets. Having to code that myself is unfortunate, the upshot being that many small, federated SQL Azure instances becomes more attractive. –  Luke Puplett Feb 26 '13 at 21:18
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You do not need to query for all possibly partition keys when doing a parallel search. You can use a combination of "less than" and "greater than" to search for multiple PartitionKey instances within the same thread. –  Herve Roggero Mar 5 '13 at 1:25
    
@HerveRoggero Is correct, although you'll still want to make sure you include all possible PartitionKeys in those queries even if hitting multiple at once. –  Jaxidian Apr 1 '13 at 20:43
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As Gaurav says, it's not automatic. But that doesn't mean it can't be done.

You can execute against Azure Tables in parallel very easily if you can make certain assumptions on your PartitionKey. For example if your PartitionKey is a GUID, you can start 10 threads for example by searching for your data in ranges. Here is an example of the range you would use on the first thread, retrieving all entities in the range [a, e[. Note that you can tune this as needed and run 20 threads if you want.

(PartitionKey ge 'a' and PartitionKey lt 'e')

If instead of GUIDs you use a non-unique value, let's say a list of countries, you would simply start as many threads as you have countries.

The only case you really need to scan your entire Azure Table is when the PartitionKey is the same for all the entities, in which case you are probably facing a design issue.

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