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I am trying to map a business object to a Data-First, auto-generated Entity. However, the Iam getting an error in my mapper class where I am returning a new Lab.

The error is "Cannot Convert expression type 'LabManager.DataAcces.Lab' to return type LabManager.BusinessObjects.BusinessObjects.Lab"

My question is: Why am I getting this error when I am returning exactly what it expects in my mapper class?

My business object looks like this:

namespace LabManager.BusinessObjects.BusinessObjects
{
    public class Lab
    {
        public Lab()
        {

        }
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public IList<Cylinder> Cylinders { get; set; }
    }
}

The Entity I am mapping the business object to is:

public partial class Lab
{
    public Lab()
    {
        this.Cylinders = new HashSet<Cylinder>();
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Cylinder> Cylinders { get; set; }
}

And I am just using a hand-rolled mapper class (no AutoMapper):

namespace EmitLabManager.DataAccess.ModelMapper
public class Mapper
{
   internal static BusinessObjects.BusinessObjects.Lab GetLabs(Lab entity)
   {
        return new Lab
        {
             Id = entity.Id,
             Name = entity.Name,
             Cylinders = entity.Cylinders
        };
    }
}
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Why do you use full type name for Lab only in method declaration and not everywhere? –  Kniganapolke Feb 26 '13 at 15:43
    
@Kniganapolke That's a good question. I suppose I should. I've never really had to qualify like this before. I usually try to keep my object names rather unique so has not to have to qualify in this manner. I am most likely going to refactor the names and redundant namespace as well (BusinessObjects.BusinessObjects). –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 26 '13 at 15:54
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You most likely have a namespace conflict. You'll want to fully-qualify the constructor in your GetLabs function:

return new BusinessObjects.BusinessObjects.Lab
    {
         Id = entity.Id,
         Name = entity.Name,
         Cylinders = entity.Cylinders
    };

That should do the trick.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Adding that namespace to the initializer did clear up "the red" on ID and Name, but I continue to have an error on the line where I am initializing Cylinders. The error now is "Cannot convert source type System.Collections.Generic.ICollection<LabManager.DataAccess.Cylinder>' to target type 'System.Collections.Generic.ICollection<LabManager.BusinessObjects.BusinessObjec‌​ts.Cylinder>' Is this still a namespace issue? –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 26 '13 at 15:52
    
Fully qualify type of the argument as well. –  Kniganapolke Feb 26 '13 at 15:58
    
Yes, that's the same issue. However, you'll need to write a conversion method for the entity.Cylinders class - the name is the same as the Cylinders property in your Lab object, but they're actually different objects entirely. The EF might have created a converter for you; otherwise, you'll have to make a new BusinessObjects.Cylinder and assign the properties one by one from the DataAccess.Cylinder. –  Steven Westbrook Feb 26 '13 at 15:58
    
Could you provide me with an example of a conversion method? I checked and the The Cylinder class in DataAccess is singular and in the DataAccess.Lab class the property name is plural. Shouldnt this be distinct enough? –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 26 '13 at 16:07
    
@StevenWestbrook OHHHHHH I just saw what you meant about the Cylinders being the same but different. I read the error again. –  Isaiah Nelson Feb 26 '13 at 16:17
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