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I have a big text file from which I want to remove some lines that are in another text file. It seems that the sed command in Unix shell is a good way to do this. However, I haven't been able to figure out which flags to use for this. .

database.txt:

this is line 1
this is line 2
this is line 3
this is line 4
this is line 5

lines_to_remove.txt

this is line 1
this is line 3

what_i_want.txt

this is line 2
this is line 4
this is line 5
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

grep is much better suited than sed for this:

grep -Fxv -f lines_to_remove.txt database.txt > what_i_really_really_want.txt
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Are you sure that command works or is it on my end? I am getting a grep: Invalid back reference. –  nunos Feb 26 '13 at 16:01
    
Your lines_to_remove.txt file must contain some special characters. Try adding -F. Editing... –  William Pursell Feb 26 '13 at 16:02
    
won't work correctly if database.txt has something like this is line 10. You should add -x to match whole lines. –  dogbane Feb 26 '13 at 16:02
    
@dogbane Good suggestion. –  William Pursell Feb 26 '13 at 16:03

I would use comm for this:

comm -1 <(sort database.txt) <(sort lines_to_remove.txt) > what_i_want.txt

The command is much better suited to your needs.

NOTE: The <(commmand) syntax is a bashism and is therefore much maligned on SO. It's short hand for the following:

sort database.txt > sorted_database.txt
sort lines_to_remove.txt > sorted_lines_to_remove.txt
comm -1 sorted_database.txt sorted_lines_to_remove.txt > what_i_want.txt
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In awk:

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[$0];next}!($0 in a)' remove.txt database.txt
this is line 2
this is line 4
this is line 5

$ awk 'NR==FNR{a[$0];next}!($0 in a)' remove.txt database.txt > output.txt
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+1 for the solution but I recommend you don't use the letter l (el) as a variable name as it looks too much like the number 1 (one) and is even indistinguishable in some fonts and so obfuscates your code. Ditto for the letter O (oh) vs the number 0 (zero). –  Ed Morton Feb 26 '13 at 16:51

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