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I need to calculate the mean and variance of a subset of a vector. Let x be the vector and y be an indicator for whether the observation is in the subset. Which is more efficient:

sub.mean <- mean(x[y])
sub.var  <-  var(x[y])

or

sub      <- x[y]
sub.mean <- mean(sub)
sub.var  <-  var(sub)
sub      <- NULL

The first approach doesn't create a new object explicitly; but do the calls to mean and var do that implicitly? Or do they work on the original vector as stored?

Is the second faster because it doesn't have to do the subsetting twice?

I'm concerned with speed and with memory management for large data sets.

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If you're concerned about working with truly large datasets, then you'll have to move away from R (or do a lot of sampling). That aside, why not benchmark the two approaches? –  Jack Maney Feb 26 '13 at 15:59
7  
@JackManey: That's just not true (or constructive), especially since you don't know how large the user's "large" datasets are. –  David Robinson Feb 26 '13 at 16:02
2  
@JackManey, With the 'ff' and 'ffbase' packages (and other "big data" packages), pure open-source R can be quite capable of handling very large datasets with efficiency and speed. There is also proof from the Revolutions Analytics folks that R can be extended to provide better-than-SAS performance for "big data" glm work. R isn't necessarily a bottle-neck, although the base packages will crumble under large datasets. –  Dinre Feb 26 '13 at 16:29
    
Tried to make the title a little more descriptive - hope I captured your meaning, @Charlie. –  Matt Parker Feb 26 '13 at 16:30
    
Thanks @MattParker. I think that the issue is more general than just descriptive statistics; I just chose those functions because they were simple to use in the illustration. But I'm fine with whatever title the site finds most appropriate. –  Charlie Feb 26 '13 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Benchmarking on a vector of length 10M indicates that (on my machine) the latter approach is faster:

f1 = function(x, y) {
    sub.mean <- mean(x[y])
    sub.var  <-  var(x[y])
}

f2 = function(x, y) {
    sub      <- x[y]
    sub.mean <- mean(sub)
    sub.var  <-  var(sub)
    sub      <- NULL
}

x = rnorm(10000000)
y = rbinom(10000000, 1, .5)

print(system.time(f1(x, y)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.403   0.037   0.440 
print(system.time(f2(x, y)))
#   user  system elapsed 
#  0.233   0.002   0.235 

This isn't surprising- mean(x[y]) does have to create a new object for the mean function to act on, even if it doesn't add it to the local namespace. Thus, f1 is slower for having to do the subsetting twice (as you surmised).

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The microbenchmark package is much better for this sort of comparison : library(microbenchmark); microbenchmark(f1(x, y), f2(x, y)) –  hadley Feb 26 '13 at 23:27

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