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Hi I have code here where I don't understand why I hit the breakpoint (see comment).

Is this a Microsoft bug of something I don't know or I don't understand properly ?

The code was tested in Debug but I think it should not changes anything.

Note: You can test the code directly in a console app.

JUST FOR INFORMATION... following supercat answer, I fixed my code with proposed solution and it works nicely :-) !!! The bad thing is the usage of a static dict and the performance the goes with it but it works. ... After few minutes, I realized that SuperCat give me all hints to do it better, to workaround the static dictionary and I did it. Code samples are:

  1. Code with the bug
  2. Code corrected but with a static ConditionalWeakTable
  3. Code with ConditioalWeakTable that include the SuperCat tricks (thanks so much to him !)

Samples...

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace WeakrefBug
{

// **********************************************************************
class B : IDisposable
{
    public static List<B> AllBs = new List<B>();

    public B()
    {
        AllBs.Add(this);
    }

    private bool disposed = false;
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            AllBs.Remove(this);
            disposed = true;
        }
    }

    ~B() { Dispose(false); }
}

// **********************************************************************
class A
{
    WeakReference _weakB = new WeakReference(new B());

    ~A()
    {
        B b = _weakB.Target as B;
        if (b == null)
        {
            if (B.AllBs.Count == 1)
            {
                Debugger.Break(); // b Is still referenced but my weak reference can't find it, why ?
            }
        }
        else { b.Dispose(); }
    }
}

// **********************************************************************
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A a = new A();
        a = null;

        GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
}

Version corrected:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

namespace WeakrefBug // Working fine with ConditionalWeakTable
{
    // **********************************************************************
    class B : IDisposable
    {
        public static List<B> AllBs = new List<B>();

        public B()
        {
            AllBs.Add(this);
        }

        private bool disposed = false;
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!disposed)
            {
                AllBs.Remove(this);
                disposed = true;
            }
        }

        ~B() { Dispose(false); }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class A
    {
        private static readonly System.Runtime.CompilerServices.ConditionalWeakTable<A, B> WeakBs = new ConditionalWeakTable<A, B>();

        public A()
        {
            WeakBs.Add(this, new B());          
        }

        public B CreateNewB()
        {
            B b = new B();
            WeakBs.Remove(this);
            WeakBs.Add(this, b);
            return b;
        }

        ~A()
        {
            B b;
            WeakBs.TryGetValue(this, out b);

            if (b == null)
            {
                if (B.AllBs.Count == 1)
                {
                    Debugger.Break(); // B Is still referenced but my weak reference can't find it, why ?
                }
            }
            else { b.Dispose(); }
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A a = new A();
            WeakReference weakB = new WeakReference(a.CreateNewB()); // Usually don't need the internal value, but only to ensure proper functionnality
            a = null;

            GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Debug.Assert(!weakB.IsAlive);
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
}

Code with ConditioalWeakTable that include the SuperCat tricks (thanks so much to him !)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

namespace WeakrefBug // Working fine with non static ConditionalWeakTable - auto cleanup
{
    // **********************************************************************
    class B : IDisposable
    {
        public static List<B> AllBs = new List<B>();

        public B()
        {
            AllBs.Add(this);
        }

        private bool disposed = false;
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!disposed)
            {
                AllBs.Remove(this);
                disposed = true;
            }
        }

        ~B() { Dispose(false); }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class A
    {
        private ConditionalWeakTable<object, object> _weakBs = null;

        public A()
        {
        }

        public B CreateNewB()
        {
            B b = new B();
            if (_weakBs == null)
            {
                _weakBs = new ConditionalWeakTable<object, object>();
                _weakBs.Add(b, _weakBs);
            }
            _weakBs.Remove(this);
            _weakBs.Add(this, b);
            return b;
        }

        internal ConditionalWeakTable<object, object> ConditionalWeakTable // TestOnly
        {
            get { return _weakBs; }
        }

        ~A()
        {
            object objB;
            _weakBs.TryGetValue(this, out objB);

            if (objB == null)
            {
                if (B.AllBs.Count == 1)
                {
                    Debugger.Break(); // B Is still referenced but my weak reference can't find it, why ?
                }
            }
            else
            {
                ((B)objB).Dispose();
            }
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            A a = new A();
            WeakReference weakB = new WeakReference(a.CreateNewB()); // Usually don't need the internal value, but only to ensure proper functionnality
            WeakReference weakConditionalWeakTable = new WeakReference(a.ConditionalWeakTable);
            a = null;

            GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Debug.Assert(!weakB.IsAlive);
            Debug.Assert(!weakConditionalWeakTable.IsAlive);
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************

}

Following question of CitizenInsane... I don't remember exactly why I did what I did... I found my sample but wasn't sure about my intention at that time. I tried to figure it out and came with the following code which I thing is more clear but still don't remember my original need. Sorry ???

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.CompilerServices;

namespace WeakrefBug // Working fine with ConditionalWeakTable
{
    // **********************************************************************
    class B : IDisposable
    {
        public static List<B> AllBs = new List<B>();

        public B()
        {
            AllBs.Add(this);
        }

        private bool disposed = false;
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!disposed)
            {
                AllBs.Remove(this);
                disposed = true;
            }
        }

        ~B() { Dispose(false); }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class A
    {
        private ConditionalWeakTable<object, object> _weakBs = null;
        private WeakReference _weakB = null;

        public A()
        {
            _weakBs = new ConditionalWeakTable<object, object>();
            B b = new B();
            _weakB = new WeakReference(b);
            _weakBs.Add(b, _weakB);
        }

        public B B
        {
            get
            {
                return _weakB.Target as B;
            }
            set { _weakB.Target = value; }
        }

        internal ConditionalWeakTable<object, object> ConditionalWeakTable // TestOnly
        {
            get { return _weakBs; }
        }

        ~A()
        {
            B objB = B;

            if (objB == null)
            {
                if (B.AllBs.Count == 1)
                {
                    Debugger.Break(); // B Is still referenced but my weak reference can't find it, why ?
                }
            }
            else
            {
                ((B)objB).Dispose();
            }
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Test1();
            Test2();
        }

        private static void Test1()
        {
            A a = new A();
            WeakReference weakB = new WeakReference(a.B); // Usually don't need the internal value, but only to ensure proper functionnality
            WeakReference weakConditionalWeakTable = new WeakReference(a.ConditionalWeakTable);

            a = null;

            GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Debug.Assert(B.AllBs.Count == 0);

            GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Debug.Assert(!weakB.IsAlive); // Need  second pass of Collection to be collected
            Debug.Assert(!weakConditionalWeakTable.IsAlive);
        }

        private static void Test2()
        {
            A a = new A();
            WeakReference weakB = new WeakReference(a.B);

            B.AllBs.Clear();
            a.B = null;

            GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration);
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Debug.Assert(!weakB.IsAlive); // Need  second pass of Collection to be collected
        }
    }

    // **********************************************************************

}
share|improve this question
    
Please clarify is this release or debug mode. Also, the comment says "B is still referenced", but B is a type. Did you mean b? –  Brian Rasmussen Feb 26 '13 at 16:10
    
Could it not be because when the breakpoint is triggered b is null, so the GC collects it anyway? I'm not certain mind. –  Kobunite Feb 26 '13 at 16:12
1  
All bets are off in the finalizer. –  leppie Feb 26 '13 at 16:13
    
@ Brian Rasmussen: clarifications done, thanks –  Eric Ouellet Feb 26 '13 at 16:14
    
@EricOuellet Thanks. Debug/release is important in this case because the release mode GC may consider objects to be eligible for collection as soon as they are no longer accessed within a function. –  Brian Rasmussen Feb 26 '13 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A sometimes-irksome limitation of WeakReference is that a WeakReference may be invalidated if if no strongly-rooted reference exists to the WeakReference itself, and this may occur even if the trackResurrection constructor parameter was true, and *even if the target of the WeakReference is strongly rooted. This behavior stems from the fact that aWeakReferencehas an unmanaged resource (a GC handle) and if the finalizer for theWeakReference` didn't clean up the GC handle, it would never get cleaned up and would constitute a memory leak.

If it will be necessary for an object's finalizers to make use of WeakReference objects, the object must make some provision to ensure that those objects remain strongly referenced. I'm not sure what the best pattern is to accomplish this, but the ConditionalWeakTable<TKey,TValue> that was added in .net 4.0 may be useful. It's a little bit like Dictionary<TKey,TValue> except that as long as a the table itself is strongly referenced and a given key is strongly referenced, its corresponding value will be regarded as strongly referenced. Note that if a ConditionalWeakTable holds an entry linking X to Y, and Y to the table, then as long as X or Y remains, the table will remain as well.

share|improve this answer
    
To my angel... Hé thanks a lot !!! It's people like you that make me happy to be a programmer. In fact, to be human. It give me some hope in humanity. Thank you so much. I understand every thing now... At least I think. (Long weak is for condition where situation should care of code marked for deletetion by the GC but waiting to be finalized). I didn't know for the ConditionalWeakTable and it is exactly what I was looking for. I could have done many artifacts but that exactly fits my need. –  Eric Ouellet Mar 1 '13 at 19:59
    
I think I got you completely this time. It took a while but at least I did it !!! Thannks again !!! –  Eric Ouellet Mar 1 '13 at 20:37

The WeakReference _weakB is available for garbage collection at the same time as the object a is. You don't have a guarantee of order here, so it could very well be that _weakB is finalized before object a.

Accessing _weakB in the finalizer of A is dangerous, since you don't know the state of _weakB. I'm guessing that in your case it has been finalized, and that that is causing it to return null for .Target.

share|improve this answer
    
One way to test this theory out is to take a static reference to _weakB so that it cannot be garbage collected/finalized before obect a –  Matt Smith Feb 26 '13 at 16:38
    
@ Matt: I think you also missed out the collection where reside the strong reference. Then b is not eligible for GC when the "a" finalizer is called. –  Eric Ouellet Feb 26 '13 at 16:41
2  
@Erik, I said nothing of b. I said the _weakB is eligible for GC. Notice you are using _weakB in the finalizer of A, but _weakB might already be finalized--and I'm guessing that once finalized, it will return null for .Target (even though object b is still live) –  Matt Smith Feb 26 '13 at 16:43
    
@ Matt --> Kind of logic. But it is also crazy* and very restrictive. * crazy because it is a special langage object and the weak reference should be valid. That is the only way to ensure to release a weak event properly and completely without any timer, polling and/or other artifacts. –  Eric Ouellet Feb 26 '13 at 17:01
1  
I don't see it as being restrictive at all--if you need a reference to something, take a reference to it. Ask your question that shows the restrictiveness your talking about, and you'll probably get a better solution. –  Matt Smith Feb 26 '13 at 17:49

There are two aspects of garbage collection that you didn't count on:

  • The exact time at which the WeakReference.IsAlive becomes false. Your code implicitly assumes that will happen when the finalizer runs. This is not the case, it happens when the object gets garbage collected. After which the object is placed on the finalizer queue, because it has a finalizer and GC.SuppressFinalize() wasn't called, waiting for the finalizer thread to do its job. So there's a period of time where IsAlive is false but ~B() hasn't run yet.

  • The order in which objects get finalized is not predictable. You implicitly assume that B is finalized before A. You cannot make this assumption.

There's also a bug in the B.Dispose() method, it won't correctly count B instances when the client code explicitly disposed the object. You haven't hit that bug yet.

There is no reasonable way to fix this code. Moreover, it tests something that is already backed by hard guarantees provided by the CLR. Just remove it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for replying. You are in majority right. But I can’t see why you say that I assume that B is finalized before A. I also can’t see what is the bug is B.Dispose() – count of B instances. I did not make my code MT safe to keep things simple. I was assuming 1 thing: The target of the weak reference was still valid in the finalizer of “A”. –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 '13 at 15:54
    
According to Matt, you and decompiled WeakReference prototype, I now highly suspect that WeakReference “Target” is suppress in its own finalizer. That assumption make me feel that is so much restrictive that should be calculated as a language design flaw. The target should be valid until WeakReference is really destroyed (or WeakReference finalizers should be called after every other finalizers in queue). –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 '13 at 15:55
    
Because your answer is very similar to Matt, I will mark Matt answer as accepted answer. He was the first and I would say that you have a pretty good reputation already ;-) ! –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 '13 at 15:55
    
… Where 2 objects in relation could have different lifespan but are not static and you want one to be advise of something from the other, you use WeakEvent. I know you know that. But the only way (without artifacts: polling, controller, timer, …) for the handler of the event to advise the source that it is dying and to clean up its ~weak pointers to the handler is through the usage of handler finalizer having WeakReference to the source. But with a WeakReference that is not valid in finalizer, everything become impossible to realize simply (it add extraneous works and artifacts). –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 '13 at 15:57
    
Thanks a lot Hans, I appreciate your answer and confirm me what was my error - my assumption of the validity of the WeakEvent - "target" and where is sounds like it has be destroyed. –  Eric Ouellet Feb 27 '13 at 15:59

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