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The assignment I attempted to do is past its due date, so you are not doing my homework.

For the sake of learning, I would like to know how to do a few things.

I was able to make a program, with a mask using bitwise operators print out 1-32 in binary.

The problem with the mask I used is that it would also print out 32 leading zeros, followed by the binary number (ex. 0000000000000000000000000000000001 for the number 1)

This is what I had

    # include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    using namespace std; 

    string naiveBitToChar( int num ) 
    {

string st;
unsigned mask = 0x80000000;

if( num == 0 )
{
    return "0";
}

while( ( num & mask ) )
    mask >>= 1;
do 
{
    if ( num & mask ) 
    {
        st = st + "1";
    } 
        else 
        {
            st = st + "0";
        }

    mask >>= 1;
}
while( mask );


return st;
    }


    int main ( int argc, char* argv[] ) {

argc; argv;

    for( int i = 0; i < 32; i++ )
        cout << naiveBitToChar(i) << "\n";
    system ("pause");
    }

I needed to:

  1. Remove the leading zeros from the string
  2. Add a minimum width of 8 numbers in each string (ex. 00000010)
  3. Add underscores after every 4th number, by using a seperator mask (ex. 0000_1000)

I am new to C++, my teacher would not even look at my code, please someone explain, and try to keep it basic. Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
We might not be doing your homework, but we are supplementing your study. What textbook are you using? How did the teacher expect you to complete the assignment? How do you think others completed it? It's not to do with cleverness or getting others to do it for you, it's hard work. As my grandmother used to say "Hard work is never easy, it's always hard!". –  Peter Wood Feb 26 '13 at 17:32

2 Answers 2

Here's an idea, use a flag to indicate a leading zero digit. Change the flag if the bit is a one. Print the digit only if it is not a leading zero.

bool is_leading_zero = true;
while (/*... */)
{
  // Convert bit to character in st
  if (st == '1')
  {
    is_leading_zero = false;
  }
  if (!is_leading_zero)
  {
    cout << st;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

If you scan from right to left, then it will be easier, as you do not need to remove leading zeros, but just to stop when number is 0:

std::string binary( unsigned n )
{
    std::string bits;
    for( unsigned mask = 1; true; mask <<=1 ) {
        bits.insert( bits.begin(), n & mask ? '1' : '0' );
        n &= ~mask;
        if( !n ) break;
    }
    return bits;
}

Or even simpler:

std::string binary( unsigned n )
{
    std::string bits;
    do {
        bits.insert( bits.begin(), n & 1 ? '1' : '0' );
        n >>= 1;
    } while( n );
    return bits;
}

To change minimum witdth you would need to modify loop condition slightly, to add unserscore can be as simple as:

if( bits.length() % 4 ) bits.insert( bits.begin(), '_' );

inside loop

share|improve this answer

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