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I am working on this project which has passed through many coders' hands. The application is two-part - Web and Batch. The web part provides a basic UI for the user to set some configurations. It uses JDBC/JNDI/non-Spring and the DAOs were written based on that.

The batch part generates files like PDF, PostScripts, XML and etc. This bit uses JDBC/Spring and the DAO's were written based on that.

Now there is only a single codebase but the codes are separated in several folders or modules - the Web (war file), Batch (java apps run from .bat or .sh), and Commons (jar file). Although both the Web and Batch uses the same Commons jar file, the DAOs are so fragmented such that it is hard to write a new module with shared DAO's that can be used both in codes deployed in web and batch.

Since I will be supporting this project for considerably long time, I decided to start make improvements. First and foremost, combining all DAOs in a way new modules will use a unified set of DAOs and old modules to use the existing fragile codes.

Below, com.abc.core2.dao.ABCDAO will hold a reference to a single instance of DataSource and use that in either web or batch to get connections from the database. The DataSource objects are taken from each module's core DAO's and cache it in ABCDAO.dataSource instance variable.

Has anyone done something like this before? Any problems with keeping a single DataSource object until an application is restarted?

The change is still a prototype though. My client outsourced some other simple changes to a bunch of people.

Common (jar file)

package com.abc.core2.dao;
public class ABCDAO {
    private static ABCDAO abcdao = new ABCDAO();
    private DataSource dataSource;
    public void setInternalDataSource(DataSource dataSource) {this.dataSource = dataSource;}
    public DataSource getInternalDataSource() { return this.dataSource; }
    public static ABCDAO getInstance() { return this.abcdao; }
    ...
}
public class NewModuleJdbcDao implements NewModuleDAO {
    ...
    public List<XYZBean> getXYZ(SearchBean sb) {
        Connection con = ABCDAO.getInstance().getInternalDataSource().getConnection();
        ...
        con.close();
        return listOfXYZBeans;
    }
}

Batch Application

import com.abc.core2.dao.ABCDAO;
public abstract InformixBaseDAO extends ABCBaseDAO { 
    {
        // via Spring JDBC XML configuration
        ABCDAO.getInstance().setDataSource(NewConnectionPooler.getInstance().dataSource()); 
    }
    public Connection getConnection() throws SQLException {
        // pre-existing method. It does NewConnectionPooler.getInstance().getConnection()
        ...
        return connection;
    }
}

// Use same NewModuleJdbcDao in Web application
public class NewModuleClass001 {

    public void show(SearchBean bean) { 
        ...
        NewModuleJdbcDao dao = new NewModuleJdbcDao();
        List<XYZBean> list = dao.getXYZ(bean);
        ...
    }
}

Web Application

import com.abc.core2.dao.ABCDAO;
public class DBConnection {
    private static DataSource dataSource = null;
    {
        if(dataSource == null) {
            dataSource = ServiceLocator.getInstance().getDataSource(...); // via JNDI
            ABCDAO.getInstance().setDataSource(dataSource);
        }
    }
    public static Connection() {

        // Spring JDBC 
        ... 
    }
}

// Use same NewModuleJdbcDao in Web application
public class NewModuleClass001 {

    public void show(SearchBean bean) { 
        ...
        NewModuleJdbcDao dao = new NewModuleJdbcDao();
        List<XYZBean> list = dao.getXYZ(bean);
        ...
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

I always used in my practice this strategy and haven't familiar with any problem based on that solution. If You are using also spring define your pooled datasource as an application-scoped singleton bean and inject it in your modules.

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1  
I'm using OSGI, which is a little different to Spring, and we can successfully share the same datasource between different bean components. I imagine it is fine in Spring too. –  vikingsteve Feb 26 '13 at 17:19

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